Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Facilitating autonomous motivation for smoking cessation.
Health Psychol. 2002 Jan; 21(1):40-50.HP

Abstract

Physicians used either an autonomy-supportive or a controlling interpersonal style to counsel smokers based on National Cancer Institute guidelines. Physician autonomy support was rated from audiotapes, and patients' perceived competence and autonomous motivation for quitting were self-reported on questionnaires. Validated point prevalences for 6, 12, and 30 months and for continuous cessation were examined. The intervention did not have a direct effect on quit rates; however, structural equation modeling supported the self-determination process model of smoking cessation. The model indicated that the autonomy-supportive intervention was rated as more autonomy supportive, that rated autonomy support predicted autonomous motivation, and that autonomous motivation predicted cessation at all points in time. Perceived competence contributed independent variance to cessation only at 6 months.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, New York 14627, USA. geoffrey_williams@urmc.rochester.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11846344

Citation

Williams, Geoffrey C., et al. "Facilitating Autonomous Motivation for Smoking Cessation." Health Psychology : Official Journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 21, no. 1, 2002, pp. 40-50.
Williams GC, Gagné M, Ryan RM, et al. Facilitating autonomous motivation for smoking cessation. Health Psychol. 2002;21(1):40-50.
Williams, G. C., Gagné, M., Ryan, R. M., & Deci, E. L. (2002). Facilitating autonomous motivation for smoking cessation. Health Psychology : Official Journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, 21(1), 40-50.
Williams GC, et al. Facilitating Autonomous Motivation for Smoking Cessation. Health Psychol. 2002;21(1):40-50. PubMed PMID: 11846344.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Facilitating autonomous motivation for smoking cessation. AU - Williams,Geoffrey C, AU - Gagné,Marylène, AU - Ryan,Richard M, AU - Deci,Edward L, PY - 2002/2/16/pubmed PY - 2002/8/21/medline PY - 2002/2/16/entrez SP - 40 EP - 50 JF - Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association JO - Health Psychol VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - Physicians used either an autonomy-supportive or a controlling interpersonal style to counsel smokers based on National Cancer Institute guidelines. Physician autonomy support was rated from audiotapes, and patients' perceived competence and autonomous motivation for quitting were self-reported on questionnaires. Validated point prevalences for 6, 12, and 30 months and for continuous cessation were examined. The intervention did not have a direct effect on quit rates; however, structural equation modeling supported the self-determination process model of smoking cessation. The model indicated that the autonomy-supportive intervention was rated as more autonomy supportive, that rated autonomy support predicted autonomous motivation, and that autonomous motivation predicted cessation at all points in time. Perceived competence contributed independent variance to cessation only at 6 months. SN - 0278-6133 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11846344/Facilitating_autonomous_motivation_for_smoking_cessation_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/hea/21/1/40 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -