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Pancreatic enzyme therapy and nutritional status of outpatients with chronic pancreatitis.
Gastroenterol Nurs 2001 Mar-Apr; 24(2):84-7GN

Abstract

Patients with chronic pancreatitis are at risk for poor nutritional status. The two major clinical features of chronic pancreatitis are abdominal pain and maldigestion, both resulting in malnutrition. Abdominal pain often results in decreased oral intake, and decreased enzyme production results in maldigestion. Enzyme therapy often is included in treating chronic pancreatitis. There is limited data on the nutritional assessment of outpatients with chronic pancreatitis, and the efficacy of the use of enzyme therapy remains controversial. Serum albumin level and measurement of ideal body weight are two simple measures of nutritional status that can be obtained by gastroenterology nurses. A retrospective chart review was done of patients seen in our outpatient clinic for management of chronic pancreatitis. Serum albumin levels, an indicator of protein calorie malnutrition, were reviewed for 34 patients. Thirty-three percent of these patients were found to have mild-to-moderate protein calorie malnutrition as evidenced by low serum albumin levels. Enzyme therapy information was reviewed for 33 patients. Patients receiving enzyme therapy had better nutritional status based on both serum albumin levels and percent of ideal body weight. Gastroenterology nurses can be instrumental in the recognition and treatment of nutritional deficiencies in chronic pancreatitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section for Endoscopy and Pancreatic-Biliary Disease, Center for Endoscopy and Pancreatic-Biliary Disease, Department of Gastroenterology, S40, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44194, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11847733

Citation

Trolli, P A., et al. "Pancreatic Enzyme Therapy and Nutritional Status of Outpatients With Chronic Pancreatitis." Gastroenterology Nursing : the Official Journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates, vol. 24, no. 2, 2001, pp. 84-7.
Trolli PA, Conwell DL, Zuccaro G. Pancreatic enzyme therapy and nutritional status of outpatients with chronic pancreatitis. Gastroenterol Nurs. 2001;24(2):84-7.
Trolli, P. A., Conwell, D. L., & Zuccaro, G. (2001). Pancreatic enzyme therapy and nutritional status of outpatients with chronic pancreatitis. Gastroenterology Nursing : the Official Journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates, 24(2), pp. 84-7.
Trolli PA, Conwell DL, Zuccaro G. Pancreatic Enzyme Therapy and Nutritional Status of Outpatients With Chronic Pancreatitis. Gastroenterol Nurs. 2001;24(2):84-7. PubMed PMID: 11847733.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pancreatic enzyme therapy and nutritional status of outpatients with chronic pancreatitis. AU - Trolli,P A, AU - Conwell,D L, AU - Zuccaro,G,Jr PY - 2002/2/19/pubmed PY - 2002/3/16/medline PY - 2002/2/19/entrez SP - 84 EP - 7 JF - Gastroenterology nursing : the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates JO - Gastroenterol Nurs VL - 24 IS - 2 N2 - Patients with chronic pancreatitis are at risk for poor nutritional status. The two major clinical features of chronic pancreatitis are abdominal pain and maldigestion, both resulting in malnutrition. Abdominal pain often results in decreased oral intake, and decreased enzyme production results in maldigestion. Enzyme therapy often is included in treating chronic pancreatitis. There is limited data on the nutritional assessment of outpatients with chronic pancreatitis, and the efficacy of the use of enzyme therapy remains controversial. Serum albumin level and measurement of ideal body weight are two simple measures of nutritional status that can be obtained by gastroenterology nurses. A retrospective chart review was done of patients seen in our outpatient clinic for management of chronic pancreatitis. Serum albumin levels, an indicator of protein calorie malnutrition, were reviewed for 34 patients. Thirty-three percent of these patients were found to have mild-to-moderate protein calorie malnutrition as evidenced by low serum albumin levels. Enzyme therapy information was reviewed for 33 patients. Patients receiving enzyme therapy had better nutritional status based on both serum albumin levels and percent of ideal body weight. Gastroenterology nurses can be instrumental in the recognition and treatment of nutritional deficiencies in chronic pancreatitis. SN - 1042-895X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11847733/Pancreatic_enzyme_therapy_and_nutritional_status_of_outpatients_with_chronic_pancreatitis_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=11847733 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -