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Pergolide in the treatment of patients with early and advanced Parkinson's disease.
Clin Neuropharmacol. 2002 Jan-Feb; 25(1):1-10.CN

Abstract

Introduced on the market in 1989, pergolide, a D1/D2 dopamine receptor agonist, is still widely prescribed for the treatment of patients with early and advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Initially, pergolide was introduced as an adjunct therapy to levodopa treatment in patients exhibiting fluctuating motor responses and dyskinesias. Results of recent randomized controlled clinical trials in de novo patients with PD show that pergolide is able to improve parkinsonian symptoms when used as monotherapy. Moreover, preliminary results of a long-term monotherapy study in early PD suggest that pergolide is as effective as levodopa, and that a significant delay in the time of the onset of levodopa-induced motor complications can be obtained. A number of randomized studies have shown that pergolide is more effective than bromocriptine as adjunct therapy to levodopa in patients with advanced PD; the greater benefit found with pergolide could be ascribed to its action on both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors. However, controlled comparative studies with new dopamine agonists, such as ropinirole, cabergoline, and pramipexole, have not been performed yet. Interestingly, few open studies in patients with complicated PD have shown that high doses of pergolide (> 6 mg/d) are able to improve motor fluctuations and dyskinesias through a dramatic reduction of levodopa dosage. The side-effect profile of pergolide is similar to that of other dopamine agonists, and complications such as sleep attack and serosal fibrosis have been rarely reported.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neuroscience, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. u.bonuccelli@neuro.med.unipi.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11852289

Citation

Bonuccelli, Ubaldo, et al. "Pergolide in the Treatment of Patients With Early and Advanced Parkinson's Disease." Clinical Neuropharmacology, vol. 25, no. 1, 2002, pp. 1-10.
Bonuccelli U, Colzi A, Del Dotto P. Pergolide in the treatment of patients with early and advanced Parkinson's disease. Clin Neuropharmacol. 2002;25(1):1-10.
Bonuccelli, U., Colzi, A., & Del Dotto, P. (2002). Pergolide in the treatment of patients with early and advanced Parkinson's disease. Clinical Neuropharmacology, 25(1), 1-10.
Bonuccelli U, Colzi A, Del Dotto P. Pergolide in the Treatment of Patients With Early and Advanced Parkinson's Disease. Clin Neuropharmacol. 2002 Jan-Feb;25(1):1-10. PubMed PMID: 11852289.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pergolide in the treatment of patients with early and advanced Parkinson's disease. AU - Bonuccelli,Ubaldo, AU - Colzi,Anna, AU - Del Dotto,Paolo, PY - 2002/2/20/pubmed PY - 2002/6/18/medline PY - 2002/2/20/entrez SP - 1 EP - 10 JF - Clinical neuropharmacology JO - Clin Neuropharmacol VL - 25 IS - 1 N2 - Introduced on the market in 1989, pergolide, a D1/D2 dopamine receptor agonist, is still widely prescribed for the treatment of patients with early and advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Initially, pergolide was introduced as an adjunct therapy to levodopa treatment in patients exhibiting fluctuating motor responses and dyskinesias. Results of recent randomized controlled clinical trials in de novo patients with PD show that pergolide is able to improve parkinsonian symptoms when used as monotherapy. Moreover, preliminary results of a long-term monotherapy study in early PD suggest that pergolide is as effective as levodopa, and that a significant delay in the time of the onset of levodopa-induced motor complications can be obtained. A number of randomized studies have shown that pergolide is more effective than bromocriptine as adjunct therapy to levodopa in patients with advanced PD; the greater benefit found with pergolide could be ascribed to its action on both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors. However, controlled comparative studies with new dopamine agonists, such as ropinirole, cabergoline, and pramipexole, have not been performed yet. Interestingly, few open studies in patients with complicated PD have shown that high doses of pergolide (> 6 mg/d) are able to improve motor fluctuations and dyskinesias through a dramatic reduction of levodopa dosage. The side-effect profile of pergolide is similar to that of other dopamine agonists, and complications such as sleep attack and serosal fibrosis have been rarely reported. SN - 0362-5664 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11852289/Pergolide_in_the_treatment_of_patients_with_early_and_advanced_Parkinson's_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/00002826-200201000-00001 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -