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Oral contraceptives as related to cancer and benign lesions of the breast.
J Natl Cancer Inst 1975; 55(4):767-73JNCI

Abstract

We conducted a case-control study to search for any relationship between use of oral contraceptives and development of breast cancer or benign breast disease. Women less than 50 years old with these diseases were matched with 2 controls by age, race, religion, and hospital. Home interviews elicited information on oral contraceptive use and other host and environmental factors. The study population comprised 1,770 women, including 452 with breast cancer and 446 with benign breast disease. The relative risk of developing cancer or benign disease was measured by matched set and summary chi-square analyses. Although the relative risk of developing breast cancer among "ever-users" of oral contraceptives was 1.1, the risk among women using oral contraceptives for 2-4 years was 1.9 (significantly increased). This risk estimate reached 2.5 for the 2- to 4-year users if they were still taking oral contraceptives when entered into study. Moreover, prior biopsy for benign breast disease increased the cancer risk among long-term users by as much as 11-fold. The relative risk of breast cancer did not vary by age, interval since first use, earliest year of use, or interval since last use. These results could be interpreted to indicate that oral contraceptives did not induce breast cancer but may have accelerated the growth rate of preexisting breast cancer. The relative risk of developing benign breast disease among ever-users of oral contraceptives was 0.8 (significantly reduced); it decreased with longer duration of use until it reached 0.2 for women who took these hormones 8 years or more. The relative risk of benign breast was not affected by earliest year of use or interval since last use. We concluded that oral contraceptives reduced the incidence of benign breast disease, but that use of steroid hormones is ill-advised for women with already established benign breast disease.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1185801

Citation

Fasal, E, and R S. Paffenbarger. "Oral Contraceptives as Related to Cancer and Benign Lesions of the Breast." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 55, no. 4, 1975, pp. 767-73.
Fasal E, Paffenbarger RS. Oral contraceptives as related to cancer and benign lesions of the breast. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1975;55(4):767-73.
Fasal, E., & Paffenbarger, R. S. (1975). Oral contraceptives as related to cancer and benign lesions of the breast. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 55(4), pp. 767-73.
Fasal E, Paffenbarger RS. Oral Contraceptives as Related to Cancer and Benign Lesions of the Breast. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1975;55(4):767-73. PubMed PMID: 1185801.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oral contraceptives as related to cancer and benign lesions of the breast. AU - Fasal,E, AU - Paffenbarger,R S,Jr PY - 1975/10/11/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1975/10/11/entrez KW - Age Factors KW - Biology KW - Breast Cancer KW - Cancer KW - Comparative Studies KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Methods--side effects KW - Cultural Background KW - Demographic Factors KW - Diseases KW - Ethnic Groups KW - Family Planning KW - High Risk Women KW - Mammary Gland Effects KW - Neoplasms KW - Oral Contraceptives--side effects KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Religion KW - Reproduction KW - Research Methodology KW - Studies SP - 767 EP - 73 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 55 IS - 4 N2 - We conducted a case-control study to search for any relationship between use of oral contraceptives and development of breast cancer or benign breast disease. Women less than 50 years old with these diseases were matched with 2 controls by age, race, religion, and hospital. Home interviews elicited information on oral contraceptive use and other host and environmental factors. The study population comprised 1,770 women, including 452 with breast cancer and 446 with benign breast disease. The relative risk of developing cancer or benign disease was measured by matched set and summary chi-square analyses. Although the relative risk of developing breast cancer among "ever-users" of oral contraceptives was 1.1, the risk among women using oral contraceptives for 2-4 years was 1.9 (significantly increased). This risk estimate reached 2.5 for the 2- to 4-year users if they were still taking oral contraceptives when entered into study. Moreover, prior biopsy for benign breast disease increased the cancer risk among long-term users by as much as 11-fold. The relative risk of breast cancer did not vary by age, interval since first use, earliest year of use, or interval since last use. These results could be interpreted to indicate that oral contraceptives did not induce breast cancer but may have accelerated the growth rate of preexisting breast cancer. The relative risk of developing benign breast disease among ever-users of oral contraceptives was 0.8 (significantly reduced); it decreased with longer duration of use until it reached 0.2 for women who took these hormones 8 years or more. The relative risk of benign breast was not affected by earliest year of use or interval since last use. We concluded that oral contraceptives reduced the incidence of benign breast disease, but that use of steroid hormones is ill-advised for women with already established benign breast disease. SN - 0027-8874 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1185801/Oral_contraceptives_as_related_to_cancer_and_benign_lesions_of_the_breast_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/55.4.767 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -