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Cues paired with a low dose of alcohol acquire conditioned incentive properties in social drinkers.
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2002 Jan; 159(3):325-34.P

Abstract

RATIONALE

Drug-related cues may acquire incentive properties through classical conditioning.

OBJECTIVE

The present study investigated whether arbitrary stimuli paired with a low dose of alcohol would evoke differential skin conductance, salivary, craving and attentional orienting responses compared to arbitrary stimuli paired with vehicle in a sample of social drinkers.

METHODS

A discriminative classical conditioning procedure was employed, in which subjects repeatedly consumed two drinks, which differed in terms of the flavour of the drink and the colour of the glass in which it was administered. One of the drinks (CS+) always contained 0.2 g/kg ethanol in flavoured tonic water and the other drink (CS-) always contained flavoured tonic water only. Alcohol craving, amount of salivation, and skin conductance level were measured in response to CS+ and CS- during conditioning training. After conditioning training, the frequency with which subjects directed their attention to CS+ and CS- drinks and their choice of drinks was assessed.

RESULTS

Comparable taste intensity ratings were given for alcohol and placebo drinks. Higher ratings of craving in the presence of CS+ and higher feelings of "lightheaded", "relaxed" and "contented" after consumption of the CS+ drink (compared with CS-) were observed over successive conditioning sessions. Skin conductance level was also higher in response to CS+ compared to CS-. After conditioning sessions were completed, subjects shifted their gaze more frequently towards CS+ than CS-, although they did not choose to consume more CS+ than CS- drinks when instructed to choose between them.

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest that conditioned responses to an arbitrary cue paired with alcohol will develop rapidly and provide further support for incentive salience theories of drug addiction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Experimental Psychology, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, UK.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11862366

Citation

Field, Matthew, and Theodora Duka. "Cues Paired With a Low Dose of Alcohol Acquire Conditioned Incentive Properties in Social Drinkers." Psychopharmacology, vol. 159, no. 3, 2002, pp. 325-34.
Field M, Duka T. Cues paired with a low dose of alcohol acquire conditioned incentive properties in social drinkers. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2002;159(3):325-34.
Field, M., & Duka, T. (2002). Cues paired with a low dose of alcohol acquire conditioned incentive properties in social drinkers. Psychopharmacology, 159(3), 325-34.
Field M, Duka T. Cues Paired With a Low Dose of Alcohol Acquire Conditioned Incentive Properties in Social Drinkers. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2002;159(3):325-34. PubMed PMID: 11862366.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cues paired with a low dose of alcohol acquire conditioned incentive properties in social drinkers. AU - Field,Matthew, AU - Duka,Theodora, Y1 - 2001/10/19/ PY - 2001/07/02/received PY - 2001/08/30/accepted PY - 2002/2/28/pubmed PY - 2002/5/8/medline PY - 2002/2/28/entrez SP - 325 EP - 34 JF - Psychopharmacology JO - Psychopharmacology (Berl.) VL - 159 IS - 3 N2 - RATIONALE: Drug-related cues may acquire incentive properties through classical conditioning. OBJECTIVE: The present study investigated whether arbitrary stimuli paired with a low dose of alcohol would evoke differential skin conductance, salivary, craving and attentional orienting responses compared to arbitrary stimuli paired with vehicle in a sample of social drinkers. METHODS: A discriminative classical conditioning procedure was employed, in which subjects repeatedly consumed two drinks, which differed in terms of the flavour of the drink and the colour of the glass in which it was administered. One of the drinks (CS+) always contained 0.2 g/kg ethanol in flavoured tonic water and the other drink (CS-) always contained flavoured tonic water only. Alcohol craving, amount of salivation, and skin conductance level were measured in response to CS+ and CS- during conditioning training. After conditioning training, the frequency with which subjects directed their attention to CS+ and CS- drinks and their choice of drinks was assessed. RESULTS: Comparable taste intensity ratings were given for alcohol and placebo drinks. Higher ratings of craving in the presence of CS+ and higher feelings of "lightheaded", "relaxed" and "contented" after consumption of the CS+ drink (compared with CS-) were observed over successive conditioning sessions. Skin conductance level was also higher in response to CS+ compared to CS-. After conditioning sessions were completed, subjects shifted their gaze more frequently towards CS+ than CS-, although they did not choose to consume more CS+ than CS- drinks when instructed to choose between them. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that conditioned responses to an arbitrary cue paired with alcohol will develop rapidly and provide further support for incentive salience theories of drug addiction. SN - 0033-3158 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11862366/Cues_paired_with_a_low_dose_of_alcohol_acquire_conditioned_incentive_properties_in_social_drinkers_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-001-0923-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -