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The cost-effectiveness of vaccinating chronic hepatitis C patients against hepatitis A.
Am J Gastroenterol. 2002 Feb; 97(2):427-34.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Although hepatitis A vaccination is recommended for persons with chronic liver disease, the cost-effectiveness of vaccinating patients with chronic hepatitis C virus has not been extensively studied. We evaluated its costs and benefits.

METHODS

A Markov model was used to assess cost-effectiveness from the health system and societal perspectives. Costs of hepatitis A screening and vaccination were compared with savings from reduced hepatitis A treatment and work loss to determine net costs of a "screen and vaccinate" strategy. Net costs were compared with longevity gains to assess cost-effectiveness.

RESULTS

Based on hypothetical cohorts of 100,000 patients, vaccination would reduce the number of hepatitis A cases 63-72%, depending on patient age. Screening and vaccination costs of $5.2 million would be partially offset by $1.5-$2.8 million reductions in hepatitis A treatment costs and $0.2-$1.0 million reductions in work loss costs. From the health system perspective, vaccination would cost $22,256, $50,391, and $102,064 per life-year saved for patients vaccinated at ages 30, 45, and 60 yr, respectively. Cost-effectiveness ratios improve when work loss prevention is considered. Results are most sensitive to hepatitis A infection and hospitalization rates, and the rate used to discount future benefits to their present values.

CONCLUSIONS

Hepatitis A vaccination of chronic hepatitis C patients would substantially reduce morbidity and mortality in all age groups examined. Consistent with other medical interventions for chronic hepatitis C patients, cost-effectiveness is most favorable for younger patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Capitol Outcomes Research, Alexandria, Virginia 22310, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11866283

Citation

Jacobs, R Jake, et al. "The Cost-effectiveness of Vaccinating Chronic Hepatitis C Patients Against Hepatitis A." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 97, no. 2, 2002, pp. 427-34.
Jacobs RJ, Koff RS, Meyerhoff AS. The cost-effectiveness of vaccinating chronic hepatitis C patients against hepatitis A. Am J Gastroenterol. 2002;97(2):427-34.
Jacobs, R. J., Koff, R. S., & Meyerhoff, A. S. (2002). The cost-effectiveness of vaccinating chronic hepatitis C patients against hepatitis A. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 97(2), 427-34.
Jacobs RJ, Koff RS, Meyerhoff AS. The Cost-effectiveness of Vaccinating Chronic Hepatitis C Patients Against Hepatitis A. Am J Gastroenterol. 2002;97(2):427-34. PubMed PMID: 11866283.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The cost-effectiveness of vaccinating chronic hepatitis C patients against hepatitis A. AU - Jacobs,R Jake, AU - Koff,Raymond S, AU - Meyerhoff,Allen S, PY - 2002/2/28/pubmed PY - 2002/3/15/medline PY - 2002/2/28/entrez SP - 427 EP - 34 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 97 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Although hepatitis A vaccination is recommended for persons with chronic liver disease, the cost-effectiveness of vaccinating patients with chronic hepatitis C virus has not been extensively studied. We evaluated its costs and benefits. METHODS: A Markov model was used to assess cost-effectiveness from the health system and societal perspectives. Costs of hepatitis A screening and vaccination were compared with savings from reduced hepatitis A treatment and work loss to determine net costs of a "screen and vaccinate" strategy. Net costs were compared with longevity gains to assess cost-effectiveness. RESULTS: Based on hypothetical cohorts of 100,000 patients, vaccination would reduce the number of hepatitis A cases 63-72%, depending on patient age. Screening and vaccination costs of $5.2 million would be partially offset by $1.5-$2.8 million reductions in hepatitis A treatment costs and $0.2-$1.0 million reductions in work loss costs. From the health system perspective, vaccination would cost $22,256, $50,391, and $102,064 per life-year saved for patients vaccinated at ages 30, 45, and 60 yr, respectively. Cost-effectiveness ratios improve when work loss prevention is considered. Results are most sensitive to hepatitis A infection and hospitalization rates, and the rate used to discount future benefits to their present values. CONCLUSIONS: Hepatitis A vaccination of chronic hepatitis C patients would substantially reduce morbidity and mortality in all age groups examined. Consistent with other medical interventions for chronic hepatitis C patients, cost-effectiveness is most favorable for younger patients. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11866283/The_cost_effectiveness_of_vaccinating_chronic_hepatitis_C_patients_against_hepatitis_A_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1572-0241.2002.05481.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -