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Self-injurious behavior in women with eating disorders.
Am J Psychiatry 2002; 159(3):408-11AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The authors assessed lifetime and 6-month occurrence and phenomenology of self-injurious behavior in patients with eating disorders.

METHOD

Women (N=376) in inpatient treatment for an eating disorder (anorexia: N=119, bulimia: N=137, eating disorder not otherwise specified: N=120) were assessed for self-injurious behavior and completed the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire, the Dissociative Experience Scale, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale.

RESULTS

The lifetime rate of self-injurious behavior occurrence was 34.6%, with the highest rates found in subjects with eating disorder not otherwise specified (35.8%) and bulimia (34.3%); the 6-month rate of self-injurious behavior occurrence was 21.3%. Multivariate comparisons were computed for the factors of self-injurious behavior and diagnostic subgroup: self-injuring patients reported a significantly higher number of traumatic events, showed significantly higher dissociation scores, and exhibited significantly more obsessive-compulsive thoughts and behaviors. Bulimic patients showed significantly higher impulsivity scores.

CONCLUSIONS

This study strongly supports the assumption that patients with eating disorders are at risk for self-injurious behavior and points to the necessity of a routine screening for self-injurious behavior as well as the development of a standardized questionnaire. Group comparisons point to the relevance of traumatic experiences and comorbid dissociative phenomenology.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medizinisch-Psychosomatische Klinik Bad Bramstedt, Germany. TPaul@Schoen-Kliniken.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11870004

Citation

Paul, Thomas, et al. "Self-injurious Behavior in Women With Eating Disorders." The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 159, no. 3, 2002, pp. 408-11.
Paul T, Schroeter K, Dahme B, et al. Self-injurious behavior in women with eating disorders. Am J Psychiatry. 2002;159(3):408-11.
Paul, T., Schroeter, K., Dahme, B., & Nutzinger, D. O. (2002). Self-injurious behavior in women with eating disorders. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 159(3), pp. 408-11.
Paul T, et al. Self-injurious Behavior in Women With Eating Disorders. Am J Psychiatry. 2002;159(3):408-11. PubMed PMID: 11870004.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-injurious behavior in women with eating disorders. AU - Paul,Thomas, AU - Schroeter,Kirsten, AU - Dahme,Bernhard, AU - Nutzinger,Detlev O, PY - 2002/3/1/pubmed PY - 2002/3/15/medline PY - 2002/3/1/entrez SP - 408 EP - 11 JF - The American journal of psychiatry JO - Am J Psychiatry VL - 159 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The authors assessed lifetime and 6-month occurrence and phenomenology of self-injurious behavior in patients with eating disorders. METHOD: Women (N=376) in inpatient treatment for an eating disorder (anorexia: N=119, bulimia: N=137, eating disorder not otherwise specified: N=120) were assessed for self-injurious behavior and completed the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire, the Dissociative Experience Scale, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale. RESULTS: The lifetime rate of self-injurious behavior occurrence was 34.6%, with the highest rates found in subjects with eating disorder not otherwise specified (35.8%) and bulimia (34.3%); the 6-month rate of self-injurious behavior occurrence was 21.3%. Multivariate comparisons were computed for the factors of self-injurious behavior and diagnostic subgroup: self-injuring patients reported a significantly higher number of traumatic events, showed significantly higher dissociation scores, and exhibited significantly more obsessive-compulsive thoughts and behaviors. Bulimic patients showed significantly higher impulsivity scores. CONCLUSIONS: This study strongly supports the assumption that patients with eating disorders are at risk for self-injurious behavior and points to the necessity of a routine screening for self-injurious behavior as well as the development of a standardized questionnaire. Group comparisons point to the relevance of traumatic experiences and comorbid dissociative phenomenology. SN - 0002-953X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11870004/Self_injurious_behavior_in_women_with_eating_disorders_ L2 - https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/appi.ajp.159.3.408?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -