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Dietary fat and meat intake in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes in men.
Diabetes Care. 2002 Mar; 25(3):417-24.DC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine dietary fat and meat intake in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

We prospectively followed 42,504 male participants of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who were aged 40-75 years and free of diagnosed diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer in 1986. Diet was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire and updated in 1990 and 1994. During 12 years of follow-up, we ascertained 1,321 incident cases of type 2 diabetes.

RESULTS

Intakes of total fat (multivariate RR for extreme quintiles 1.27, CI 1.04-1.55, P for trend=0.02) and saturated fat (1.34, 1.09-1.66, P for trend=0.01) were associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these associations disappeared after additional adjustment for BMI (total fat RR 0.97, CI 0.79-1.18; saturated fat 0.97, 0.79-1.20). Intakes of oleic acid, trans-fat, long-chain n-3 fat, and alpha-linolenic acid were not associated with diabetes risk after multivariate adjustment. Linoleic acid was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in men <65 years of age (RR 0.74, CI 0.60-0.92, P for trend=0.01) and in men with a BMI <25 kg/m(2) (0.53, 0.33-0.85, P for trend=0.006) but not in older and obese men. Frequent consumption of processed meat was associated with a higher risk for type 2 diabetes (RR 1.46, CI 1.14-1.86 for > or = 5/week vs. <1/month, P for trend <0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS

Total and saturated fat intake were associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, but these associations were not independent of BMI. Frequent consumption of processed meats may increase risk of type 2 diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. rob.van.dam@rivm.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11874924

Citation

van Dam, Rob M., et al. "Dietary Fat and Meat Intake in Relation to Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Men." Diabetes Care, vol. 25, no. 3, 2002, pp. 417-24.
van Dam RM, Willett WC, Rimm EB, et al. Dietary fat and meat intake in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes in men. Diabetes Care. 2002;25(3):417-24.
van Dam, R. M., Willett, W. C., Rimm, E. B., Stampfer, M. J., & Hu, F. B. (2002). Dietary fat and meat intake in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes in men. Diabetes Care, 25(3), 417-24.
van Dam RM, et al. Dietary Fat and Meat Intake in Relation to Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Men. Diabetes Care. 2002;25(3):417-24. PubMed PMID: 11874924.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fat and meat intake in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes in men. AU - van Dam,Rob M, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Rimm,Eric B, AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Hu,Frank B, PY - 2002/3/5/pubmed PY - 2002/5/11/medline PY - 2002/3/5/entrez SP - 417 EP - 24 JF - Diabetes care JO - Diabetes Care VL - 25 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine dietary fat and meat intake in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We prospectively followed 42,504 male participants of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who were aged 40-75 years and free of diagnosed diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer in 1986. Diet was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire and updated in 1990 and 1994. During 12 years of follow-up, we ascertained 1,321 incident cases of type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: Intakes of total fat (multivariate RR for extreme quintiles 1.27, CI 1.04-1.55, P for trend=0.02) and saturated fat (1.34, 1.09-1.66, P for trend=0.01) were associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these associations disappeared after additional adjustment for BMI (total fat RR 0.97, CI 0.79-1.18; saturated fat 0.97, 0.79-1.20). Intakes of oleic acid, trans-fat, long-chain n-3 fat, and alpha-linolenic acid were not associated with diabetes risk after multivariate adjustment. Linoleic acid was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in men <65 years of age (RR 0.74, CI 0.60-0.92, P for trend=0.01) and in men with a BMI <25 kg/m(2) (0.53, 0.33-0.85, P for trend=0.006) but not in older and obese men. Frequent consumption of processed meat was associated with a higher risk for type 2 diabetes (RR 1.46, CI 1.14-1.86 for > or = 5/week vs. <1/month, P for trend <0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Total and saturated fat intake were associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, but these associations were not independent of BMI. Frequent consumption of processed meats may increase risk of type 2 diabetes. SN - 0149-5992 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11874924/Dietary_fat_and_meat_intake_in_relation_to_risk_of_type_2_diabetes_in_men_ L2 - http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=11874924 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -