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Complementary and alternative medicine use among health plan members. A cross-sectional survey.
Eff Clin Pract. 2002 Jan-Feb; 5(1):17-22.EC

Abstract

CONTEXT. Many health plans have started to cover the cost of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). National survey data indicate that CAM use is highly prevalent among adults. However, little is known about CAM use among health plan members.

OBJECTIVE

To describe CAM users, the prevalence of CAM use, and how CAM use relates to utilization of conventional preventive services and health care satisfaction among health plan members.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional mail survey in 1997.

SETTING

Managed care organization in Minnesota.

SAMPLE

Random sample of health plan members aged 40 and older stratified by number of chronic diseases; 4404 (86%) of the 5107 returned completed questionnaires.

MEASURES

Use of CAM, patient characteristics (e.g., chronic diseases, health status), health behaviors (e.g., smoking, diet, exercise), and interaction with conventional health care (e.g., use of preventive services, having a primary care doctor, health care satisfaction).

RESULTS

Overall, 42% reported the use of at least one CAM therapy; the most common were relaxation techniques (18%), massage (12%), herbal medicine (10%), and megavitamin therapy (9%). Perceived efficacy of CAM ranged from 76% (hypnosis) to 98% (energy healing). CAM users tended to be female, younger, better educated, and employed. Users of CAM reported more physical and emotional limitations, more pain, and more dysthymia but were not more likely to have a chronic condition. CAM users were slightly more likely to have a primary care provider (86% vs. 82% had chosen a primary care provider; P =0.014) and had more favorable health-related behaviors. CAM users and nonusers were equally likely to use conventional preventive services and were equally satisfied with their health plan.

CONCLUSION

CAM use is highly prevalent among health plan members. CAM users report more physical and emotional limitations than do nonusers. CAM does not seem to be a substitute for conventional preventive health care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Health Promotion, HealthPartners, Minneapolis, Minn 55440-1309, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11878283

Citation

Gray, Carolyn M., et al. "Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Health Plan Members. a Cross-sectional Survey." Effective Clinical Practice : ECP, vol. 5, no. 1, 2002, pp. 17-22.
Gray CM, Tan AW, Pronk NP, et al. Complementary and alternative medicine use among health plan members. A cross-sectional survey. Eff Clin Pract. 2002;5(1):17-22.
Gray, C. M., Tan, A. W., Pronk, N. P., & O'Connor, P. J. (2002). Complementary and alternative medicine use among health plan members. A cross-sectional survey. Effective Clinical Practice : ECP, 5(1), 17-22.
Gray CM, et al. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Health Plan Members. a Cross-sectional Survey. Eff Clin Pract. 2002 Jan-Feb;5(1):17-22. PubMed PMID: 11878283.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Complementary and alternative medicine use among health plan members. A cross-sectional survey. AU - Gray,Carolyn M, AU - Tan,Agnes W H, AU - Pronk,Nicolaas P, AU - O'Connor,Patrick J, PY - 2002/3/7/pubmed PY - 2002/3/23/medline PY - 2002/3/7/entrez SP - 17 EP - 22 JF - Effective clinical practice : ECP JO - Eff Clin Pract VL - 5 IS - 1 N2 - UNLABELLED: CONTEXT. Many health plans have started to cover the cost of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). National survey data indicate that CAM use is highly prevalent among adults. However, little is known about CAM use among health plan members. OBJECTIVE: To describe CAM users, the prevalence of CAM use, and how CAM use relates to utilization of conventional preventive services and health care satisfaction among health plan members. DESIGN: Cross-sectional mail survey in 1997. SETTING: Managed care organization in Minnesota. SAMPLE: Random sample of health plan members aged 40 and older stratified by number of chronic diseases; 4404 (86%) of the 5107 returned completed questionnaires. MEASURES: Use of CAM, patient characteristics (e.g., chronic diseases, health status), health behaviors (e.g., smoking, diet, exercise), and interaction with conventional health care (e.g., use of preventive services, having a primary care doctor, health care satisfaction). RESULTS: Overall, 42% reported the use of at least one CAM therapy; the most common were relaxation techniques (18%), massage (12%), herbal medicine (10%), and megavitamin therapy (9%). Perceived efficacy of CAM ranged from 76% (hypnosis) to 98% (energy healing). CAM users tended to be female, younger, better educated, and employed. Users of CAM reported more physical and emotional limitations, more pain, and more dysthymia but were not more likely to have a chronic condition. CAM users were slightly more likely to have a primary care provider (86% vs. 82% had chosen a primary care provider; P =0.014) and had more favorable health-related behaviors. CAM users and nonusers were equally likely to use conventional preventive services and were equally satisfied with their health plan. CONCLUSION: CAM use is highly prevalent among health plan members. CAM users report more physical and emotional limitations than do nonusers. CAM does not seem to be a substitute for conventional preventive health care. SN - 1099-8128 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11878283/Complementary_and_alternative_medicine_use_among_health_plan_members__A_cross_sectional_survey_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -