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Resection of residual pulmonary masses after chemotherapy in patients with metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours.
Intern Med J. 2002 Mar; 32(3):79-83.IM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Resection of residual post-chemotherapy pulmonary masses in patients with non-seminomatous germ cell tumours gives therapeutic benefit and prognostic information.

AIM

This study was undertaken to review the experience of this intervention in a single teaching hospital.

METHODS

The Germ Cell Database of the Sydney Cancer Centre was searched for all patients who had undergone excision of pulmonary metastases. These patient records were subsequently reviewed.

RESULTS

Between 1976 and 1999, 15 patients underwent a combined total of 19 thoracotomies for resection of residual tumour mass after cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The primary tumour histology included mature teratoma in 47% (7 of 15) of patients. Prior to chemotherapy, 73% (11 of 15) of patients had elevated serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein (median 180 ng/mL) and 60% (9 of 15) of patients had elevated beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (median 672 IU/L). The median length of hospital stay related to thoracotomy was 7 days. There were two surgical complications, a prolonged air leak and a residual pleural effusion. Pathology of residual pulmonary masses revealed necrosis alone in 37% (7 of 19) of procedures, mature teratoma alone in 32% (6 of 19) of procedures and viable tumour in 32% (6 of 19) of procedures. Of those with viable tumour, three achieved long-term complete response (CR), two died of progressive disease (PD) and one is alive with PD. Of those with teratoma, two achieved CR and one relapsed. The long-term CR rate was 80% (12 of 15 patients). The median follow up was 10 years (range 0.75-17.5 years). Four patients died, two of PD and two of cardiovascular disease while in CR.

CONCLUSION

At this institution, thoracotomy for residual pulmonary masses was well tolerated, with a high cure rate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Oncology, Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney University, New South Wales, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11885847

Citation

Horvath, L G., et al. "Resection of Residual Pulmonary Masses After Chemotherapy in Patients With Metastatic Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumours." Internal Medicine Journal, vol. 32, no. 3, 2002, pp. 79-83.
Horvath LG, McCaughan BC, Stockle M, et al. Resection of residual pulmonary masses after chemotherapy in patients with metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours. Intern Med J. 2002;32(3):79-83.
Horvath, L. G., McCaughan, B. C., Stockle, M., & Boyer, M. J. (2002). Resection of residual pulmonary masses after chemotherapy in patients with metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours. Internal Medicine Journal, 32(3), 79-83.
Horvath LG, et al. Resection of Residual Pulmonary Masses After Chemotherapy in Patients With Metastatic Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumours. Intern Med J. 2002;32(3):79-83. PubMed PMID: 11885847.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resection of residual pulmonary masses after chemotherapy in patients with metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours. AU - Horvath,L G, AU - McCaughan,B C, AU - Stockle,M, AU - Boyer,M J, PY - 2002/3/12/pubmed PY - 2002/8/23/medline PY - 2002/3/12/entrez SP - 79 EP - 83 JF - Internal medicine journal JO - Intern Med J VL - 32 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Resection of residual post-chemotherapy pulmonary masses in patients with non-seminomatous germ cell tumours gives therapeutic benefit and prognostic information. AIM: This study was undertaken to review the experience of this intervention in a single teaching hospital. METHODS: The Germ Cell Database of the Sydney Cancer Centre was searched for all patients who had undergone excision of pulmonary metastases. These patient records were subsequently reviewed. RESULTS: Between 1976 and 1999, 15 patients underwent a combined total of 19 thoracotomies for resection of residual tumour mass after cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The primary tumour histology included mature teratoma in 47% (7 of 15) of patients. Prior to chemotherapy, 73% (11 of 15) of patients had elevated serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein (median 180 ng/mL) and 60% (9 of 15) of patients had elevated beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (median 672 IU/L). The median length of hospital stay related to thoracotomy was 7 days. There were two surgical complications, a prolonged air leak and a residual pleural effusion. Pathology of residual pulmonary masses revealed necrosis alone in 37% (7 of 19) of procedures, mature teratoma alone in 32% (6 of 19) of procedures and viable tumour in 32% (6 of 19) of procedures. Of those with viable tumour, three achieved long-term complete response (CR), two died of progressive disease (PD) and one is alive with PD. Of those with teratoma, two achieved CR and one relapsed. The long-term CR rate was 80% (12 of 15 patients). The median follow up was 10 years (range 0.75-17.5 years). Four patients died, two of PD and two of cardiovascular disease while in CR. CONCLUSION: At this institution, thoracotomy for residual pulmonary masses was well tolerated, with a high cure rate. SN - 1444-0903 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11885847/Resection_of_residual_pulmonary_masses_after_chemotherapy_in_patients_with_metastatic_non_seminomatous_germ_cell_tumours_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=1444-0903&date=2002&volume=32&issue=3&spage=79 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -