Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Toxic metals and oxidative stress part I: mechanisms involved in metal-induced oxidative damage.
Curr Top Med Chem. 2001 Dec; 1(6):529-39.CT

Abstract

Toxic metals (lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic) are widely found in our environment. Humans are exposed to these metals from numerous sources, including contaminated air, water, soil and food. Recent studies indicate that transition metals act as catalysts in the oxidative reactions of biological macromolecules therefore the toxicities associated with these metals might be due to oxidative tissue damage. Redox-active metals, such as iron, copper and chromium, undergo redox cycling whereas redox-inactive metals, such as lead, cadmium, mercury and others deplete cells' major antioxidants, particularly thiol-containing antioxidants and enzymes. Either redox-active or redox-inactive metals may cause an increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydroxyl radical (HO.), superoxide radical (O2.-) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Enhanced generation of ROS can overwhelm cells' intrinsic antioxidant defenses, and result in a condition known as "oxidative stress". Cells under oxidative stress display various dysfunctions due to lesions caused by ROS to lipids, proteins and DNA. Consequently, it is suggested that metal-induced oxidative stress in cells can be partially responsible for the toxic effects of heavy metals. Several studies are underway to determine the effect of antioxidant supplementation following heavy metal exposure. Data suggest that antioxidants may play an important role in abating some hazards of heavy metals. In order to prove the importance of using antioxidants in heavy metal poisoning, pertinent biochemical mechanisms for metal-induced oxidative stress should be reviewed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Missouri-Rolla, Department of Chemistry, 65409-0010, USA. nercal@umr.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11895129

Citation

Ercal, N, et al. "Toxic Metals and Oxidative Stress Part I: Mechanisms Involved in Metal-induced Oxidative Damage." Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, vol. 1, no. 6, 2001, pp. 529-39.
Ercal N, Gurer-Orhan H, Aykin-Burns N. Toxic metals and oxidative stress part I: mechanisms involved in metal-induced oxidative damage. Curr Top Med Chem. 2001;1(6):529-39.
Ercal, N., Gurer-Orhan, H., & Aykin-Burns, N. (2001). Toxic metals and oxidative stress part I: mechanisms involved in metal-induced oxidative damage. Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, 1(6), 529-39.
Ercal N, Gurer-Orhan H, Aykin-Burns N. Toxic Metals and Oxidative Stress Part I: Mechanisms Involved in Metal-induced Oxidative Damage. Curr Top Med Chem. 2001;1(6):529-39. PubMed PMID: 11895129.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Toxic metals and oxidative stress part I: mechanisms involved in metal-induced oxidative damage. AU - Ercal,N, AU - Gurer-Orhan,H, AU - Aykin-Burns,N, PY - 2002/3/16/pubmed PY - 2002/7/20/medline PY - 2002/3/16/entrez SP - 529 EP - 39 JF - Current topics in medicinal chemistry JO - Curr Top Med Chem VL - 1 IS - 6 N2 - Toxic metals (lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic) are widely found in our environment. Humans are exposed to these metals from numerous sources, including contaminated air, water, soil and food. Recent studies indicate that transition metals act as catalysts in the oxidative reactions of biological macromolecules therefore the toxicities associated with these metals might be due to oxidative tissue damage. Redox-active metals, such as iron, copper and chromium, undergo redox cycling whereas redox-inactive metals, such as lead, cadmium, mercury and others deplete cells' major antioxidants, particularly thiol-containing antioxidants and enzymes. Either redox-active or redox-inactive metals may cause an increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydroxyl radical (HO.), superoxide radical (O2.-) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Enhanced generation of ROS can overwhelm cells' intrinsic antioxidant defenses, and result in a condition known as "oxidative stress". Cells under oxidative stress display various dysfunctions due to lesions caused by ROS to lipids, proteins and DNA. Consequently, it is suggested that metal-induced oxidative stress in cells can be partially responsible for the toxic effects of heavy metals. Several studies are underway to determine the effect of antioxidant supplementation following heavy metal exposure. Data suggest that antioxidants may play an important role in abating some hazards of heavy metals. In order to prove the importance of using antioxidants in heavy metal poisoning, pertinent biochemical mechanisms for metal-induced oxidative stress should be reviewed. SN - 1568-0266 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11895129/Toxic_metals_and_oxidative_stress_part_I:_mechanisms_involved_in_metal_induced_oxidative_damage_ L2 - https://www.eurekaselect.com/https://www.eurekaselect.com/81596/article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -