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Dietary fat, fat subtypes, and breast cancer risk: lack of an association among postmenopausal women with no history of benign breast disease.

Abstract

A recent study among 13,707 postmenopausal women without benign breast disease (BBD) from the Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project (BCDDP) cohort found breast cancer risk associated with greater total fat, unsaturated fat, and oleic acid intake. We assessed the associations between cumulative averaged dietary intake from 1980, 1984, 1986, and 1990 with breast cancer risk through 1994 among 44,697 postmenopausal participants without BBD in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS). Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models, with age as the time variable, provided the estimated rate ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from the 14 years of follow-up and the 1,071 breast cancer cases. In the Nurses' Health Study, breast cancer rates over the time period from 1980 to 1994 did not increase significantly with greater total fat [quintile (Q) 5 versus Q1 RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.77-1.15], saturated fat (RR(Q5 to Q1), 0.88; 95% CI, 0.70-1.12), unsaturated fat (RR(Q5 to Q1), 1.16; 95% CI, 0.92-1.46), oleic acid (RR(Q5 to Q1), 1.13; 95% CI, 0.81-1.57), linoleic acid (RR(Q5 to Q1), 0.93; 95% CI, 0.74-1.16), trans fatty acid (RR(Q5 to Q1), 0.9184; 95% CI, 0.73-1.13), or energy intake (RR(Q5 to Q1), 0.81; 95% CI, 0.67-0.99). A parallel analysis restricted to the same time period as the BCDDP study did not differ substantially. We found no increase in the rate of breast cancer with greater intake of dietary fat and fat subtypes among postmenopausal women without a history of BBD.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. celia.bryne@channing.harvard.edu

    ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Breast Diseases
    Breast Neoplasms
    Cohort Studies
    Confidence Intervals
    Dietary Fats
    Dietary Fats, Unsaturated
    Female
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Postmenopause
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11895875

    Citation

    Byrne, Celia, et al. "Dietary Fat, Fat Subtypes, and Breast Cancer Risk: Lack of an Association Among Postmenopausal Women With No History of Benign Breast Disease." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 11, no. 3, 2002, pp. 261-5.
    Byrne C, Rockett H, Holmes MD. Dietary fat, fat subtypes, and breast cancer risk: lack of an association among postmenopausal women with no history of benign breast disease. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002;11(3):261-5.
    Byrne, C., Rockett, H., & Holmes, M. D. (2002). Dietary fat, fat subtypes, and breast cancer risk: lack of an association among postmenopausal women with no history of benign breast disease. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 11(3), pp. 261-5.
    Byrne C, Rockett H, Holmes MD. Dietary Fat, Fat Subtypes, and Breast Cancer Risk: Lack of an Association Among Postmenopausal Women With No History of Benign Breast Disease. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002;11(3):261-5. PubMed PMID: 11895875.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fat, fat subtypes, and breast cancer risk: lack of an association among postmenopausal women with no history of benign breast disease. AU - Byrne,Celia, AU - Rockett,H, AU - Holmes,M D, PY - 2002/3/16/pubmed PY - 2002/9/7/medline PY - 2002/3/16/entrez SP - 261 EP - 5 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 11 IS - 3 N2 - A recent study among 13,707 postmenopausal women without benign breast disease (BBD) from the Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project (BCDDP) cohort found breast cancer risk associated with greater total fat, unsaturated fat, and oleic acid intake. We assessed the associations between cumulative averaged dietary intake from 1980, 1984, 1986, and 1990 with breast cancer risk through 1994 among 44,697 postmenopausal participants without BBD in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS). Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models, with age as the time variable, provided the estimated rate ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from the 14 years of follow-up and the 1,071 breast cancer cases. In the Nurses' Health Study, breast cancer rates over the time period from 1980 to 1994 did not increase significantly with greater total fat [quintile (Q) 5 versus Q1 RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.77-1.15], saturated fat (RR(Q5 to Q1), 0.88; 95% CI, 0.70-1.12), unsaturated fat (RR(Q5 to Q1), 1.16; 95% CI, 0.92-1.46), oleic acid (RR(Q5 to Q1), 1.13; 95% CI, 0.81-1.57), linoleic acid (RR(Q5 to Q1), 0.93; 95% CI, 0.74-1.16), trans fatty acid (RR(Q5 to Q1), 0.9184; 95% CI, 0.73-1.13), or energy intake (RR(Q5 to Q1), 0.81; 95% CI, 0.67-0.99). A parallel analysis restricted to the same time period as the BCDDP study did not differ substantially. We found no increase in the rate of breast cancer with greater intake of dietary fat and fat subtypes among postmenopausal women without a history of BBD. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11895875/Dietary_fat_fat_subtypes_and_breast_cancer_risk:_lack_of_an_association_among_postmenopausal_women_with_no_history_of_benign_breast_disease_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=11895875 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -