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Factors influencing oral mucositis in patients receiving chemotherapy.
Cancer Pract 2000 Nov-Dec; 8(6):291-7CP

Abstract

PURPOSE

Oral mucositis is a painful complication of chemotherapy and can greatly affect patients' morbidity and mortality. Findings from two previous studies suggested a decrease in the prevalence of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in patients with solid tumors. The purposes of this study were to follow a large cohort of outpatients to determine the prevalence of mucositis and to identify whether certain clinical factors were significant in the development of mucositis.

DESCRIPTION OF STUDY

In this prospective study, a convenience sample of 199 outpatients was followed for three cycles or until mucositis developed. The clinical factors monitored included the following: pretreatment dental examination/repair; initial standard chemotherapy dosage; prophylactic use of colony-stimulating factors; and use of preventive mouthwashes or other prophylactic measures.

RESULTS

Oral mucositis developed in 50 patients (25.1%). Prechemotherapy dental examination/repair and initial standard chemotherapy dosage were equivalent among both groups. Of the 48 patients in whom mucositis developed, 10 (20.8%) received prophylactic colony-stimulating factors. Of 134 patients in whom mucositis did not develop, 46 (34.3%) received prophylactic colony-stimulating factors. This difference was statistically nonsignificant.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS

Differences in the clinical factors investigated could not explain the lower prevalence of oral mucositis among the current patient cohort. The reason for the diminishing prevalence of this side effect remains unclear, and additional parameters, particularly detailed oral hygiene practices, should be evaluated. In the meantime, oncology clinicians should consider the teaching of patients and urging them to use good oral hygiene practices as necessary and potentially preventive measures against chemotherapy-induced mucositis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of California, San Francisco, Department of Physiological Nursing, Box 0610, San Francisco, CA 94143-0610, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11898146

Citation

Dodd, M J., et al. "Factors Influencing Oral Mucositis in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy." Cancer Practice, vol. 8, no. 6, 2000, pp. 291-7.
Dodd MJ, Miaskowski C, Dibble SL, et al. Factors influencing oral mucositis in patients receiving chemotherapy. Cancer Pract. 2000;8(6):291-7.
Dodd, M. J., Miaskowski, C., Dibble, S. L., Paul, S. M., MacPhail, L., Greenspan, D., & Shiba, G. (2000). Factors influencing oral mucositis in patients receiving chemotherapy. Cancer Practice, 8(6), pp. 291-7.
Dodd MJ, et al. Factors Influencing Oral Mucositis in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy. Cancer Pract. 2000;8(6):291-7. PubMed PMID: 11898146.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors influencing oral mucositis in patients receiving chemotherapy. AU - Dodd,M J, AU - Miaskowski,C, AU - Dibble,S L, AU - Paul,S M, AU - MacPhail,L, AU - Greenspan,D, AU - Shiba,G, PY - 2002/3/20/pubmed PY - 2002/4/16/medline PY - 2002/3/20/entrez SP - 291 EP - 7 JF - Cancer practice JO - Cancer Pract VL - 8 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: Oral mucositis is a painful complication of chemotherapy and can greatly affect patients' morbidity and mortality. Findings from two previous studies suggested a decrease in the prevalence of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in patients with solid tumors. The purposes of this study were to follow a large cohort of outpatients to determine the prevalence of mucositis and to identify whether certain clinical factors were significant in the development of mucositis. DESCRIPTION OF STUDY: In this prospective study, a convenience sample of 199 outpatients was followed for three cycles or until mucositis developed. The clinical factors monitored included the following: pretreatment dental examination/repair; initial standard chemotherapy dosage; prophylactic use of colony-stimulating factors; and use of preventive mouthwashes or other prophylactic measures. RESULTS: Oral mucositis developed in 50 patients (25.1%). Prechemotherapy dental examination/repair and initial standard chemotherapy dosage were equivalent among both groups. Of the 48 patients in whom mucositis developed, 10 (20.8%) received prophylactic colony-stimulating factors. Of 134 patients in whom mucositis did not develop, 46 (34.3%) received prophylactic colony-stimulating factors. This difference was statistically nonsignificant. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Differences in the clinical factors investigated could not explain the lower prevalence of oral mucositis among the current patient cohort. The reason for the diminishing prevalence of this side effect remains unclear, and additional parameters, particularly detailed oral hygiene practices, should be evaluated. In the meantime, oncology clinicians should consider the teaching of patients and urging them to use good oral hygiene practices as necessary and potentially preventive measures against chemotherapy-induced mucositis. SN - 1065-4704 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11898146/Factors_influencing_oral_mucositis_in_patients_receiving_chemotherapy_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=1065-4704&date=2000&volume=8&issue=6&spage=291 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -