Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Measuring behavioral and mood disruptions in nursing home residents using the Minimum Data Set.
Outcomes Manag Nurs Pract. 2001 Jan-Mar; 5(1):28-35.OM

Abstract

The Minimum Data Set (MDS) is a standardized assessment tool designed to provide a comprehensive biopsychosocial assessment of medical, behavioral, and cognitive status of nursing home residents. This pilot study examined the relationships of three MDS subscales--cognition, depressive symptoms, and behavioral disruptions--to other measures of the same domains (e.g., diagnosed dementia and depression and caregiver ratings on the Revised Memory and Behavior Problems Checklist [RMBPC]). The sample consisted of 135 nursing home residents with a mean age of 84 years. Based on the MDS, there was a high prevalence of cognition-related behaviors but a low prevalence of disruptive and depressed behaviors. The prevalence rates were substantially different according to the RMBPC. In addition, most of the MDS subscales failed to differentiate between residents with and without diagnosed dementia and depression, whereas caregiver ratings on the RMBPC did. The MDS and RMBPC subscales were modestly related but only in residents without dementia. These findings raise questions about the validity of the MDS in measuring nursing home residents' behavior, especially depressive and disruptive behaviors. Thus, caution should be employed in using the MDS as a sole outcome measure for these behaviors, and the use of multiple measures is suggested.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Nursing, Institute on Aging, University of Florida, USA. ahorgas@nursing.ufl.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11898303

Citation

Horgas, A L., and J A. Margrett. "Measuring Behavioral and Mood Disruptions in Nursing Home Residents Using the Minimum Data Set." Outcomes Management for Nursing Practice, vol. 5, no. 1, 2001, pp. 28-35.
Horgas AL, Margrett JA. Measuring behavioral and mood disruptions in nursing home residents using the Minimum Data Set. Outcomes Manag Nurs Pract. 2001;5(1):28-35.
Horgas, A. L., & Margrett, J. A. (2001). Measuring behavioral and mood disruptions in nursing home residents using the Minimum Data Set. Outcomes Management for Nursing Practice, 5(1), 28-35.
Horgas AL, Margrett JA. Measuring Behavioral and Mood Disruptions in Nursing Home Residents Using the Minimum Data Set. Outcomes Manag Nurs Pract. 2001 Jan-Mar;5(1):28-35. PubMed PMID: 11898303.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Measuring behavioral and mood disruptions in nursing home residents using the Minimum Data Set. AU - Horgas,A L, AU - Margrett,J A, PY - 2002/3/20/pubmed PY - 2002/5/1/medline PY - 2002/3/20/entrez SP - 28 EP - 35 JF - Outcomes management for nursing practice JO - Outcomes Manag Nurs Pract VL - 5 IS - 1 N2 - The Minimum Data Set (MDS) is a standardized assessment tool designed to provide a comprehensive biopsychosocial assessment of medical, behavioral, and cognitive status of nursing home residents. This pilot study examined the relationships of three MDS subscales--cognition, depressive symptoms, and behavioral disruptions--to other measures of the same domains (e.g., diagnosed dementia and depression and caregiver ratings on the Revised Memory and Behavior Problems Checklist [RMBPC]). The sample consisted of 135 nursing home residents with a mean age of 84 years. Based on the MDS, there was a high prevalence of cognition-related behaviors but a low prevalence of disruptive and depressed behaviors. The prevalence rates were substantially different according to the RMBPC. In addition, most of the MDS subscales failed to differentiate between residents with and without diagnosed dementia and depression, whereas caregiver ratings on the RMBPC did. The MDS and RMBPC subscales were modestly related but only in residents without dementia. These findings raise questions about the validity of the MDS in measuring nursing home residents' behavior, especially depressive and disruptive behaviors. Thus, caution should be employed in using the MDS as a sole outcome measure for these behaviors, and the use of multiple measures is suggested. SN - 1093-1783 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11898303/Measuring_behavioral_and_mood_disruptions_in_nursing_home_residents_using_the_Minimum_Data_Set_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=11898303.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -