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Primary care and urology patients with the male pelvic pain syndrome: symptoms and quality of life.
J Urol 2002; 167(4):1768-73JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

We assessed symptoms and health related quality of life in men who received prostatitis-prostatodynia diagnoses at primary care and urology visits, and compared those in whom pain-discomfort had versus had not resolved approximately 1 month later.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Telephone interviews were done with 357 men an average of 1 month after a prostatitis-prostatodynia diagnosis was made at a health maintenance organization visit. The interview included the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index, and pain and health related quality of life measures.

RESULTS

The most common pain location was the pubic-bladder area. Mean scores on most health related quality of life measures were below average, and higher pelvic pain and urinary symptom scores were associated with worse quality of life. This episode of pelvic pain was the first lifetime episode in fewer urology (22%) than primary care (38%) patients (p = 0.02). Urology patients had longer symptom episodes (p = 0.000), more days with pain in the last month (p = 0.002) and higher National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index pain scores (p = 0.002). Men with pain in the testicles, penis or between the rectum and testicles at the visit, and with longer symptom duration before the visit were significantly more likely to have continued pain between the visit and interview.

CONCLUSIONS

Pelvic pain is often a persistent, recurrent condition that can have a significant negative impact on quality of life. The average symptom severity in men with pelvic pain in primary care and urology settings is lower than that in tertiary care samples.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Washington School of Medicine, Center for Health Studies, Seattle, Washington, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11912406

Citation

Turner, Judith A., et al. "Primary Care and Urology Patients With the Male Pelvic Pain Syndrome: Symptoms and Quality of Life." The Journal of Urology, vol. 167, no. 4, 2002, pp. 1768-73.
Turner JA, Hauge S, Von Korff M, et al. Primary care and urology patients with the male pelvic pain syndrome: symptoms and quality of life. J Urol. 2002;167(4):1768-73.
Turner, J. A., Hauge, S., Von Korff, M., Saunders, K., Lowe, M., & Berger, R. (2002). Primary care and urology patients with the male pelvic pain syndrome: symptoms and quality of life. The Journal of Urology, 167(4), pp. 1768-73.
Turner JA, et al. Primary Care and Urology Patients With the Male Pelvic Pain Syndrome: Symptoms and Quality of Life. J Urol. 2002;167(4):1768-73. PubMed PMID: 11912406.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Primary care and urology patients with the male pelvic pain syndrome: symptoms and quality of life. AU - Turner,Judith A, AU - Hauge,Stephanie, AU - Von Korff,Michael, AU - Saunders,Kathleen, AU - Lowe,Marc, AU - Berger,Richard, PY - 2002/3/26/pubmed PY - 2002/5/31/medline PY - 2002/3/26/entrez SP - 1768 EP - 73 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J. Urol. VL - 167 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: We assessed symptoms and health related quality of life in men who received prostatitis-prostatodynia diagnoses at primary care and urology visits, and compared those in whom pain-discomfort had versus had not resolved approximately 1 month later. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Telephone interviews were done with 357 men an average of 1 month after a prostatitis-prostatodynia diagnosis was made at a health maintenance organization visit. The interview included the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index, and pain and health related quality of life measures. RESULTS: The most common pain location was the pubic-bladder area. Mean scores on most health related quality of life measures were below average, and higher pelvic pain and urinary symptom scores were associated with worse quality of life. This episode of pelvic pain was the first lifetime episode in fewer urology (22%) than primary care (38%) patients (p = 0.02). Urology patients had longer symptom episodes (p = 0.000), more days with pain in the last month (p = 0.002) and higher National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index pain scores (p = 0.002). Men with pain in the testicles, penis or between the rectum and testicles at the visit, and with longer symptom duration before the visit were significantly more likely to have continued pain between the visit and interview. CONCLUSIONS: Pelvic pain is often a persistent, recurrent condition that can have a significant negative impact on quality of life. The average symptom severity in men with pelvic pain in primary care and urology settings is lower than that in tertiary care samples. SN - 0022-5347 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11912406/Primary_care_and_urology_patients_with_the_male_pelvic_pain_syndrome:_symptoms_and_quality_of_life_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-5347(05)65196-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -