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Epidemiology of anorectal chlamydial and gonococcal infections among men having sex with men in Seattle: utilizing serovar and auxotype strain typing.
Sex Transm Dis. 2002 Apr; 29(4):189-95.ST

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Bacterial sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among men who have sex with men (MSM) have recently increased in Seattle.

GOALS

Serovar and auxotype typing of strains was used to assess the epidemiology of anorectal chlamydial and gonococcal infections among MSM attending an STD clinic.

STUDY DESIGN

The prevalences of anorectal chlamydial infection and gonorrhea among MSM attending an STD clinic during the period of 1994 to 1996 were compared with prevalences during 1997 to 1999. A retrospective case-control study of MSM attending an STD clinic between 1997 and 1999 was performed. Anorectal chlamydial isolates were characterized by serovar and gonococcal isolates were characterized by serovar and auxotype. Infected MSM were mapped by residence and strain type.

RESULTS

Prevalences of anorectal chlamydial and gonococcal infections increased from 4.0% and 6.3%, respectively, during 1994-1996 to 7.6% and 8.7%, respectively, during 1997-1999 (P = 0.004 and P = 0.013 for chlamydial infection and gonorrhea, respectively). Most chlamydial infections were caused by serovars G (47.9%) and D (29.6%), and most gonococcal infections were caused by auxotype/serovar classes Proto/IB-1 (43.3%), Proto/IB-3 (16.5%), and Proto/IB-2 (10.3%). MSM with anorectal chlamydial infection more often had chlamydial urethritis (P = 0.005) and were not white (P = 0.046), in comparison with controls. MSM with anorectal gonorrhea more often had pharyngeal gonorrhea (P < 0.001), had a history of gonorrhea (P = 0.003), and were younger than age 30 years (P = 0.039), in comparison with controls. Residences of MSM with anorectal gonorrhea were clustered in urban areas, whereas those of MSM with anorectal chlamydial infection were more dispersed.

CONCLUSION

Prevalences of anorectal chlamydial infection and gonorrhea among MSM in Seattle have increased dramatically over the past 3 years. Serovar and auxotype analyses indicate these increases are not clonal but are due to the spread of unique distributions of strains that differ from those causing urogenital infections in the same community.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, 1959 Northeast Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11912458

Citation

Geisler, William M., et al. "Epidemiology of Anorectal Chlamydial and Gonococcal Infections Among Men Having Sex With Men in Seattle: Utilizing Serovar and Auxotype Strain Typing." Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 29, no. 4, 2002, pp. 189-95.
Geisler WM, Whittington WL, Suchland RJ, et al. Epidemiology of anorectal chlamydial and gonococcal infections among men having sex with men in Seattle: utilizing serovar and auxotype strain typing. Sex Transm Dis. 2002;29(4):189-95.
Geisler, W. M., Whittington, W. L., Suchland, R. J., & Stamm, W. E. (2002). Epidemiology of anorectal chlamydial and gonococcal infections among men having sex with men in Seattle: utilizing serovar and auxotype strain typing. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 29(4), 189-95.
Geisler WM, et al. Epidemiology of Anorectal Chlamydial and Gonococcal Infections Among Men Having Sex With Men in Seattle: Utilizing Serovar and Auxotype Strain Typing. Sex Transm Dis. 2002;29(4):189-95. PubMed PMID: 11912458.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of anorectal chlamydial and gonococcal infections among men having sex with men in Seattle: utilizing serovar and auxotype strain typing. AU - Geisler,William M, AU - Whittington,William L H, AU - Suchland,Robert J, AU - Stamm,Walter E, PY - 2002/3/26/pubmed PY - 2002/5/30/medline PY - 2002/3/26/entrez SP - 189 EP - 95 JF - Sexually transmitted diseases JO - Sex Transm Dis VL - 29 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Bacterial sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among men who have sex with men (MSM) have recently increased in Seattle. GOALS: Serovar and auxotype typing of strains was used to assess the epidemiology of anorectal chlamydial and gonococcal infections among MSM attending an STD clinic. STUDY DESIGN: The prevalences of anorectal chlamydial infection and gonorrhea among MSM attending an STD clinic during the period of 1994 to 1996 were compared with prevalences during 1997 to 1999. A retrospective case-control study of MSM attending an STD clinic between 1997 and 1999 was performed. Anorectal chlamydial isolates were characterized by serovar and gonococcal isolates were characterized by serovar and auxotype. Infected MSM were mapped by residence and strain type. RESULTS: Prevalences of anorectal chlamydial and gonococcal infections increased from 4.0% and 6.3%, respectively, during 1994-1996 to 7.6% and 8.7%, respectively, during 1997-1999 (P = 0.004 and P = 0.013 for chlamydial infection and gonorrhea, respectively). Most chlamydial infections were caused by serovars G (47.9%) and D (29.6%), and most gonococcal infections were caused by auxotype/serovar classes Proto/IB-1 (43.3%), Proto/IB-3 (16.5%), and Proto/IB-2 (10.3%). MSM with anorectal chlamydial infection more often had chlamydial urethritis (P = 0.005) and were not white (P = 0.046), in comparison with controls. MSM with anorectal gonorrhea more often had pharyngeal gonorrhea (P < 0.001), had a history of gonorrhea (P = 0.003), and were younger than age 30 years (P = 0.039), in comparison with controls. Residences of MSM with anorectal gonorrhea were clustered in urban areas, whereas those of MSM with anorectal chlamydial infection were more dispersed. CONCLUSION: Prevalences of anorectal chlamydial infection and gonorrhea among MSM in Seattle have increased dramatically over the past 3 years. Serovar and auxotype analyses indicate these increases are not clonal but are due to the spread of unique distributions of strains that differ from those causing urogenital infections in the same community. SN - 0148-5717 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11912458/Epidemiology_of_anorectal_chlamydial_and_gonococcal_infections_among_men_having_sex_with_men_in_Seattle:_utilizing_serovar_and_auxotype_strain_typing_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/00007435-200204000-00001 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -