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Increased plasma fatty acid concentrations after respiratory exacerbations are associated with elevated oxidative stress in cystic fibrosis patients.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Oxidative stress and depleted antioxidant defenses occur in stable cystic fibrosis patients. During acute infection, the balance between oxidants and antioxidants may be further disturbed.

OBJECTIVE

We examined the oxidative stress during acute infection in cystic fibrosis patients by measuring 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2 alpha) (8-iso-PGF(2 alpha)) and antioxidant defenses in relation to dietary intake, fatty acid status, immune function, and clinical status.

DESIGN

Plasma concentrations of total 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha), vitamins E and C, beta-carotene, zinc, selenium, and copper; plasma fatty acid compositions; erythrocyte glutathione concentrations; glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity; sputum glutathione and 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha) concentrations; lung function; clinical symptoms; and dietary intake were measured in 15 cystic fibrosis patients before and after 10-14 d of intravenous antibiotic treatment for a pulmonary exacerbation.

RESULTS

After treatment, respiratory status improved (percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s: 60 +/- 6% at baseline compared with 74 +/- 7% after treatment, P = 0.01), quality of well-being improved (P = 0.001), and total plasma 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha) concentrations increased from 469 nmol/L at baseline (interquartile range: 373-554 nmol/L) to 565 nmol/L after treatment (interquartile range: 429-689 nmol/L; P = 0.008). Total energy, fat, carbohydrate, and protein intakes per kilogram body weight also increased; however, dietary antioxidant intake was unchanged. Plasma fatty acid concentrations increased after treatment, strongly correlating with plasma 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha) concentrations (r = 0.768, P = 0.001). There were no significant changes in white cell counts or plasma concentrations of vitamins E and C or beta-carotene. Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity was reduced after treatment, whereas there was no significant change in superoxide dismutase activity.

CONCLUSIONS

Oxidative stress increased after treatment for pulmonary exacerbations and was strongly linked to increased concentrations of plasma fatty acids. Although intravenous antibiotic therapy and physiotherapy improved lung function within 10-14 d of treatment, the biochemical effects of oxidation continued further. Thus, antioxidant intervention during treatment for and recovery from acute infection in cystic fibrosis should be considered.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Discipline of Nutrition and Dietetics, the University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia.

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Anti-Bacterial Agents
    Antioxidants
    Bronchodilator Agents
    Child
    Cystic Fibrosis
    Diet
    Dinoprostone
    Energy Intake
    Fatty Acids
    Female
    Humans
    Isoprostanes
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Oxidative Stress
    Respiratory Function Tests
    Sputum
    Vasoconstrictor Agents

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11916752

    Citation

    Wood, Lisa G., et al. "Increased Plasma Fatty Acid Concentrations After Respiratory Exacerbations Are Associated With Elevated Oxidative Stress in Cystic Fibrosis Patients." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 75, no. 4, 2002, pp. 668-75.
    Wood LG, Fitzgerald DA, Gibson PG, et al. Increased plasma fatty acid concentrations after respiratory exacerbations are associated with elevated oxidative stress in cystic fibrosis patients. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002;75(4):668-75.
    Wood, L. G., Fitzgerald, D. A., Gibson, P. G., Cooper, D. M., & Garg, M. L. (2002). Increased plasma fatty acid concentrations after respiratory exacerbations are associated with elevated oxidative stress in cystic fibrosis patients. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 75(4), pp. 668-75.
    Wood LG, et al. Increased Plasma Fatty Acid Concentrations After Respiratory Exacerbations Are Associated With Elevated Oxidative Stress in Cystic Fibrosis Patients. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002;75(4):668-75. PubMed PMID: 11916752.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Increased plasma fatty acid concentrations after respiratory exacerbations are associated with elevated oxidative stress in cystic fibrosis patients. AU - Wood,Lisa G, AU - Fitzgerald,Dominic A, AU - Gibson,Peter G, AU - Cooper,David M, AU - Garg,Manohar L, PY - 2002/3/28/pubmed PY - 2002/4/24/medline PY - 2002/3/28/entrez SP - 668 EP - 75 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 75 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress and depleted antioxidant defenses occur in stable cystic fibrosis patients. During acute infection, the balance between oxidants and antioxidants may be further disturbed. OBJECTIVE: We examined the oxidative stress during acute infection in cystic fibrosis patients by measuring 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2 alpha) (8-iso-PGF(2 alpha)) and antioxidant defenses in relation to dietary intake, fatty acid status, immune function, and clinical status. DESIGN: Plasma concentrations of total 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha), vitamins E and C, beta-carotene, zinc, selenium, and copper; plasma fatty acid compositions; erythrocyte glutathione concentrations; glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity; sputum glutathione and 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha) concentrations; lung function; clinical symptoms; and dietary intake were measured in 15 cystic fibrosis patients before and after 10-14 d of intravenous antibiotic treatment for a pulmonary exacerbation. RESULTS: After treatment, respiratory status improved (percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s: 60 +/- 6% at baseline compared with 74 +/- 7% after treatment, P = 0.01), quality of well-being improved (P = 0.001), and total plasma 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha) concentrations increased from 469 nmol/L at baseline (interquartile range: 373-554 nmol/L) to 565 nmol/L after treatment (interquartile range: 429-689 nmol/L; P = 0.008). Total energy, fat, carbohydrate, and protein intakes per kilogram body weight also increased; however, dietary antioxidant intake was unchanged. Plasma fatty acid concentrations increased after treatment, strongly correlating with plasma 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha) concentrations (r = 0.768, P = 0.001). There were no significant changes in white cell counts or plasma concentrations of vitamins E and C or beta-carotene. Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity was reduced after treatment, whereas there was no significant change in superoxide dismutase activity. CONCLUSIONS: Oxidative stress increased after treatment for pulmonary exacerbations and was strongly linked to increased concentrations of plasma fatty acids. Although intravenous antibiotic therapy and physiotherapy improved lung function within 10-14 d of treatment, the biochemical effects of oxidation continued further. Thus, antioxidant intervention during treatment for and recovery from acute infection in cystic fibrosis should be considered. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11916752/Increased_plasma_fatty_acid_concentrations_after_respiratory_exacerbations_are_associated_with_elevated_oxidative_stress_in_cystic_fibrosis_patients_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/75.4.668 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -