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Intakes of energy and macronutrients and the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia.
Am J Clin Nutr 2002; 75(4):689-97AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease of older men. Although the etiology remains unclear, nutritional factors may have an effect on the disease.

OBJECTIVE

Because the literature on the relations between macronutrient intakes and BPH risk is limited, we examined these relations among men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study.

DESIGN

We followed men aged 40-75 y from baseline in 1986 to 1994. Total BPH cases (n = 3523) comprised men who reported BPH surgery (n = 1589) or who did not undergo surgery but scored 15-35 points on the lower urinary tract symptom questionnaire of the American Urological Association (n = 1934); non-cases were men who scored < or = 7 points (n = 24388). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs were calculated by using multivariate logistic regression.

RESULTS

The ORs rose with increasing total energy intake in a comparison of the highest and lowest quintiles for total BPH (OR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.45) and symptoms of BPH (1.43; 1.23, 1.66). Energy-adjusted total protein intake was positively associated with total BPH (1.18; 1.05, 1.33) and BPH surgery (1.26; 1.06, 1.49). Energy-adjusted total fat intake was not associated with risk of total BPH, but intakes of eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic, and arachidonic acids were associated with a moderate increase in risk of total BPH.

CONCLUSIONS

We observed modest direct associations between BPH and intakes of total energy, protein, and specific long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Because eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic, and arachidonic acids are highly unsaturated fatty acids, our findings support a possible role of oxidative stress in the etiology of BPH.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11916755

Citation

Suzuki, Sadao, et al. "Intakes of Energy and Macronutrients and the Risk of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 75, no. 4, 2002, pp. 689-97.
Suzuki S, Platz EA, Kawachi I, et al. Intakes of energy and macronutrients and the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002;75(4):689-97.
Suzuki, S., Platz, E. A., Kawachi, I., Willett, W. C., & Giovannucci, E. (2002). Intakes of energy and macronutrients and the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 75(4), pp. 689-97.
Suzuki S, et al. Intakes of Energy and Macronutrients and the Risk of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002;75(4):689-97. PubMed PMID: 11916755.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intakes of energy and macronutrients and the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia. AU - Suzuki,Sadao, AU - Platz,Elizabeth A, AU - Kawachi,Ichiro, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, PY - 2002/3/28/pubmed PY - 2002/4/24/medline PY - 2002/3/28/entrez SP - 689 EP - 97 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 75 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease of older men. Although the etiology remains unclear, nutritional factors may have an effect on the disease. OBJECTIVE: Because the literature on the relations between macronutrient intakes and BPH risk is limited, we examined these relations among men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. DESIGN: We followed men aged 40-75 y from baseline in 1986 to 1994. Total BPH cases (n = 3523) comprised men who reported BPH surgery (n = 1589) or who did not undergo surgery but scored 15-35 points on the lower urinary tract symptom questionnaire of the American Urological Association (n = 1934); non-cases were men who scored < or = 7 points (n = 24388). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs were calculated by using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: The ORs rose with increasing total energy intake in a comparison of the highest and lowest quintiles for total BPH (OR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.45) and symptoms of BPH (1.43; 1.23, 1.66). Energy-adjusted total protein intake was positively associated with total BPH (1.18; 1.05, 1.33) and BPH surgery (1.26; 1.06, 1.49). Energy-adjusted total fat intake was not associated with risk of total BPH, but intakes of eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic, and arachidonic acids were associated with a moderate increase in risk of total BPH. CONCLUSIONS: We observed modest direct associations between BPH and intakes of total energy, protein, and specific long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Because eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic, and arachidonic acids are highly unsaturated fatty acids, our findings support a possible role of oxidative stress in the etiology of BPH. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11916755/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/75.4.689 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -