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Preparation and characterization of DNA films induced by UV irradiation.
Chemistry. 2002 Mar 15; 8(6):1407-12.C

Abstract

Large amounts of DNA-enriched materials, such as salmon milts and shellfish gonads, are discarded as industrial waste. We have been able to convert the discarded DNA to a useful material by preparing novel DNA films by UV irradiation. When DNA films were irradiated with UV light, the molecular weight of DNA was greatly increased. The reaction was inhibited by addition of the radical scavenger galvinoxyl suggesting that the DNA polymerization with UV irradiation proceeded by a radical reaction. Although this UV-irradiated DNA film was water-insoluble and resistant to hydrolysis by nuclease, the structure of the DNA film in water was similar to non-irradiated DNA and maintained B-form structure. In addition, the UV-irradiated DNA film could effectively accumulate and condense harmful DNA-intercalating compounds, such as ethidium bromide and acridine orange, from diluted aqueous solutions. The binding constant and exclusion number of ethidium bromide for UV-irradiated DNA were determined to be 6.8 +/- 0.3 x 10(4) M(-1) and 1.6 +/- 0.2, respectively; these values are consisted with reported results for non-irradiated DNA. The UV-irradiated DNA films have potential uses as a biomaterial filter for the removal of harmful DNA intercalating compounds.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Bio-Material, Chemistry Division of Bioscience, Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-10, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11921224

Citation

Yamada, Masanori, et al. "Preparation and Characterization of DNA Films Induced By UV Irradiation." Chemistry (Weinheim an Der Bergstrasse, Germany), vol. 8, no. 6, 2002, pp. 1407-12.
Yamada M, Kato K, Nomizu M, et al. Preparation and characterization of DNA films induced by UV irradiation. Chemistry. 2002;8(6):1407-12.
Yamada, M., Kato, K., Nomizu, M., Sakairi, N., Ohkawa, K., Yamamoto, H., & Nishi, N. (2002). Preparation and characterization of DNA films induced by UV irradiation. Chemistry (Weinheim an Der Bergstrasse, Germany), 8(6), 1407-12.
Yamada M, et al. Preparation and Characterization of DNA Films Induced By UV Irradiation. Chemistry. 2002 Mar 15;8(6):1407-12. PubMed PMID: 11921224.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preparation and characterization of DNA films induced by UV irradiation. AU - Yamada,Masanori, AU - Kato,Kozue, AU - Nomizu,Motoyoshi, AU - Sakairi,Nobuo, AU - Ohkawa,Kousaku, AU - Yamamoto,Hiroyuki, AU - Nishi,Norio, PY - 2002/3/29/pubmed PY - 2003/4/26/medline PY - 2002/3/29/entrez SP - 1407 EP - 12 JF - Chemistry (Weinheim an der Bergstrasse, Germany) JO - Chemistry VL - 8 IS - 6 N2 - Large amounts of DNA-enriched materials, such as salmon milts and shellfish gonads, are discarded as industrial waste. We have been able to convert the discarded DNA to a useful material by preparing novel DNA films by UV irradiation. When DNA films were irradiated with UV light, the molecular weight of DNA was greatly increased. The reaction was inhibited by addition of the radical scavenger galvinoxyl suggesting that the DNA polymerization with UV irradiation proceeded by a radical reaction. Although this UV-irradiated DNA film was water-insoluble and resistant to hydrolysis by nuclease, the structure of the DNA film in water was similar to non-irradiated DNA and maintained B-form structure. In addition, the UV-irradiated DNA film could effectively accumulate and condense harmful DNA-intercalating compounds, such as ethidium bromide and acridine orange, from diluted aqueous solutions. The binding constant and exclusion number of ethidium bromide for UV-irradiated DNA were determined to be 6.8 +/- 0.3 x 10(4) M(-1) and 1.6 +/- 0.2, respectively; these values are consisted with reported results for non-irradiated DNA. The UV-irradiated DNA films have potential uses as a biomaterial filter for the removal of harmful DNA intercalating compounds. SN - 0947-6539 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11921224/Preparation_and_characterization_of_DNA_films_induced_by_UV_irradiation_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/1521-3765(20020315)8:6<1407::aid-chem1407>3.0.co;2-l DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -