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Awareness of genetic testing for colorectal cancer predisposition among specialists in gastroenterology.
Am J Gastroenterol 2002; 97(3):729-33AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Adult gastroenterologists practicing in New York State were surveyed to determine their practice with regard to identifying family histories consistent with inherited forms of colorectal cancer, and to assess their awareness of cancer genetic counseling and molecular genetic testing for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC).

METHODS

A closed-ended questionnaire was mailed to 815 gastroenterologists identified through the membership Directory of the American Gastroenterological Association (1998). Two mailings resulted in a response rate of 35%.

RESULTS

In all, 99% of the gastroenterologists obtained a family history from their patients, and 95% were aware of cancer genetic counseling. However, only 51% would routinely refer patients for genetic counseling before providing cancer predisposition testing. In addition, only 52% were aware of the availability of genetic tests for FAP and 34% for HNPCC. Presented with a family history consistent with HNPCC, 79% could identify the syndrome, 26% recommended genetic counseling for the consultand, and 16% advised appropriate screening, according to current recommendations.

CONCLUSIONS

The majority of gastroenterologists do obtain a family history on their patients. However, there is a need for physician education regarding the recognition of pedigrees consistent with inherited colorectal cancer, the genetic counseling process, and the availability of mutation testing for FAP and HNPCC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Genetics, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11922570

Citation

Batra, Shivani, et al. "Awareness of Genetic Testing for Colorectal Cancer Predisposition Among Specialists in Gastroenterology." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 97, no. 3, 2002, pp. 729-33.
Batra S, Valdimarsdottir H, McGovern M, et al. Awareness of genetic testing for colorectal cancer predisposition among specialists in gastroenterology. Am J Gastroenterol. 2002;97(3):729-33.
Batra, S., Valdimarsdottir, H., McGovern, M., Itzkowitz, S., & Brown, K. (2002). Awareness of genetic testing for colorectal cancer predisposition among specialists in gastroenterology. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 97(3), pp. 729-33.
Batra S, et al. Awareness of Genetic Testing for Colorectal Cancer Predisposition Among Specialists in Gastroenterology. Am J Gastroenterol. 2002;97(3):729-33. PubMed PMID: 11922570.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Awareness of genetic testing for colorectal cancer predisposition among specialists in gastroenterology. AU - Batra,Shivani, AU - Valdimarsdottir,Heiddis, AU - McGovern,Margaret, AU - Itzkowitz,Steven, AU - Brown,Karen, PY - 2002/4/2/pubmed PY - 2002/4/20/medline PY - 2002/4/2/entrez SP - 729 EP - 33 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 97 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Adult gastroenterologists practicing in New York State were surveyed to determine their practice with regard to identifying family histories consistent with inherited forms of colorectal cancer, and to assess their awareness of cancer genetic counseling and molecular genetic testing for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). METHODS: A closed-ended questionnaire was mailed to 815 gastroenterologists identified through the membership Directory of the American Gastroenterological Association (1998). Two mailings resulted in a response rate of 35%. RESULTS: In all, 99% of the gastroenterologists obtained a family history from their patients, and 95% were aware of cancer genetic counseling. However, only 51% would routinely refer patients for genetic counseling before providing cancer predisposition testing. In addition, only 52% were aware of the availability of genetic tests for FAP and 34% for HNPCC. Presented with a family history consistent with HNPCC, 79% could identify the syndrome, 26% recommended genetic counseling for the consultand, and 16% advised appropriate screening, according to current recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of gastroenterologists do obtain a family history on their patients. However, there is a need for physician education regarding the recognition of pedigrees consistent with inherited colorectal cancer, the genetic counseling process, and the availability of mutation testing for FAP and HNPCC. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11922570/Awareness_of_genetic_testing_for_colorectal_cancer_predisposition_among_specialists_in_gastroenterology_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=11922570 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -