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Exhaled leukotrienes and prostaglandins in asthma.
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2002 Apr; 109(4):615-20.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Most of the studies investigating the role of leukotrienes (LTs) and prostaglandins (PGs) in asthma have used invasive (eg, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) or semi-invasive (eg, sputum induction) techniques. Others have measured eicosanoids in plasma or urine, probably reflecting systemic rather than lung inflammation. Collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a noninvasive method to collect airway secretions.

OBJECTIVE

We sought to investigate whether eicosanoids are measurable in EBC, to show possible differences in their concentrations in asthmatic patients and healthy subjects, and to investigate whether exhaled eicosanoids correlate with exhaled nitric oxide (NO), a marker of airway inflammation.

METHODS

Twelve healthy nonsmokers and 15 steroid-naive patients with mild asthma were studied. Subjects attended on one occasion for pulmonary function tests, collection of EBC, and exhaled NO measurements. Exhaled LTB(4)-like immunoreactivity, LTE(4)-like immunoreactivity, PGE(2)-like immunoreactivity, PGD(2)-methoxime, PGF(2)(alpha)-like immunoreactivity, and thromboxane B(2)-like immunoreactivity were measured by means of enzyme immunoassays.

RESULTS

LTE(4)-like immunoreactivity and LTB(4)-like immunoreactivity were detectable in EBC in healthy subjects, and their levels in asthmatic patients were increased about 3-fold (P <.0001) and 2-fold (P <.0005), respectively. Exhaled NO was increased in asthmatic patients compared with healthy subjects (P <.0001). There was a correlation between exhaled LTB(4) and exhaled NO (r = 0.56, P <.04) in patients with asthma. When measurable, prostanoid levels were similar in asthmatic patients and control subjects.

CONCLUSIONS

Exhaled LTE(4) and LTB(4) are increased in steroid-naive patients with mild asthma. EBC may be proved to be a novel method to monitor airway inflammation in asthma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11941309

Citation

Montuschi, Paolo, and Peter J. Barnes. "Exhaled Leukotrienes and Prostaglandins in Asthma." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 109, no. 4, 2002, pp. 615-20.
Montuschi P, Barnes PJ. Exhaled leukotrienes and prostaglandins in asthma. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2002;109(4):615-20.
Montuschi, P., & Barnes, P. J. (2002). Exhaled leukotrienes and prostaglandins in asthma. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 109(4), 615-20.
Montuschi P, Barnes PJ. Exhaled Leukotrienes and Prostaglandins in Asthma. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2002;109(4):615-20. PubMed PMID: 11941309.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exhaled leukotrienes and prostaglandins in asthma. AU - Montuschi,Paolo, AU - Barnes,Peter J, PY - 2002/4/10/pubmed PY - 2002/5/10/medline PY - 2002/4/10/entrez SP - 615 EP - 20 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J Allergy Clin Immunol VL - 109 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Most of the studies investigating the role of leukotrienes (LTs) and prostaglandins (PGs) in asthma have used invasive (eg, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) or semi-invasive (eg, sputum induction) techniques. Others have measured eicosanoids in plasma or urine, probably reflecting systemic rather than lung inflammation. Collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a noninvasive method to collect airway secretions. OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate whether eicosanoids are measurable in EBC, to show possible differences in their concentrations in asthmatic patients and healthy subjects, and to investigate whether exhaled eicosanoids correlate with exhaled nitric oxide (NO), a marker of airway inflammation. METHODS: Twelve healthy nonsmokers and 15 steroid-naive patients with mild asthma were studied. Subjects attended on one occasion for pulmonary function tests, collection of EBC, and exhaled NO measurements. Exhaled LTB(4)-like immunoreactivity, LTE(4)-like immunoreactivity, PGE(2)-like immunoreactivity, PGD(2)-methoxime, PGF(2)(alpha)-like immunoreactivity, and thromboxane B(2)-like immunoreactivity were measured by means of enzyme immunoassays. RESULTS: LTE(4)-like immunoreactivity and LTB(4)-like immunoreactivity were detectable in EBC in healthy subjects, and their levels in asthmatic patients were increased about 3-fold (P <.0001) and 2-fold (P <.0005), respectively. Exhaled NO was increased in asthmatic patients compared with healthy subjects (P <.0001). There was a correlation between exhaled LTB(4) and exhaled NO (r = 0.56, P <.04) in patients with asthma. When measurable, prostanoid levels were similar in asthmatic patients and control subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Exhaled LTE(4) and LTB(4) are increased in steroid-naive patients with mild asthma. EBC may be proved to be a novel method to monitor airway inflammation in asthma. SN - 0091-6749 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11941309/Exhaled_leukotrienes_and_prostaglandins_in_asthma_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091674902499009 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -