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Availability of CD10 immunohistochemistry as a marker of breast myoepithelial cells on paraffin sections.
Mod Pathol. 2002 Apr; 15(4):397-405.MP

Abstract

CD10, also called common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA), was recently found to be expressed in nonhematopoietic tissues. Although CD10 was also identified in human breast myoepithelial cells, its availability of immunohistochemistry on paraffin sections has not been examined so far. In the present study, we demonstrated CD10 immunohistochemically on paraffin sections of both normal and pathological breast tissues, comparing its staining patterns to those of smooth muscle actin (SMA), which is now commonly used to highlight myoepithelium. CD10 was consistently positive in normal breast myoepithelial cells. CD10 also clearly highlighted myoepithelial cells in intraductal papilloma, adenosis, ductal hyperplasia, fibroadenoma, and phyllodes tumor as well as SMA did. In atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ, continuous, discontinuous, and totally negative stainings of both CD10 and SMA were noted, depending on foci of neoplastic cell nests. However, both stainings clearly demonstrated myoepithelial cells of cancerized acini, being useful in differentiating lobular cancerization from microinvasion. Because SMA was also positive in normal vessels and spindle-shaped stromal cells, CD10, which was negative in vessels, was useful in differentiating myoepithelial cells from thin vascular wall in intracystic lesions with delicate papillae. Although background staining of spindle-shaped stromal cells was also noted in CD10, the positive cell number was less, and the signal was weaker than that of SMA. The absence of myoepithelial cells in invasive ductal carcinomas was more clearly highlighted by CD10 than SMA. We concluded that CD10 could be another useful marker of breast myoepithelial cells on paraffin sections. Combination of CD10 and SMA will provide more sophisticated information about presence or absence of myoepithelial cells in confusing breast lesions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta-tsukinowa-cho, Ohtsu, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11950913

Citation

Moritani, Suzuko, et al. "Availability of CD10 Immunohistochemistry as a Marker of Breast Myoepithelial Cells On Paraffin Sections." Modern Pathology : an Official Journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc, vol. 15, no. 4, 2002, pp. 397-405.
Moritani S, Kushima R, Sugihara H, et al. Availability of CD10 immunohistochemistry as a marker of breast myoepithelial cells on paraffin sections. Mod Pathol. 2002;15(4):397-405.
Moritani, S., Kushima, R., Sugihara, H., Bamba, M., Kobayashi, T. K., & Hattori, T. (2002). Availability of CD10 immunohistochemistry as a marker of breast myoepithelial cells on paraffin sections. Modern Pathology : an Official Journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc, 15(4), 397-405.
Moritani S, et al. Availability of CD10 Immunohistochemistry as a Marker of Breast Myoepithelial Cells On Paraffin Sections. Mod Pathol. 2002;15(4):397-405. PubMed PMID: 11950913.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Availability of CD10 immunohistochemistry as a marker of breast myoepithelial cells on paraffin sections. AU - Moritani,Suzuko, AU - Kushima,Ryoji, AU - Sugihara,Hiroyuki, AU - Bamba,Masamichi, AU - Kobayashi,Tadao K, AU - Hattori,Takanori, PY - 2002/4/16/pubmed PY - 2002/5/16/medline PY - 2002/4/16/entrez SP - 397 EP - 405 JF - Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc JO - Mod Pathol VL - 15 IS - 4 N2 - CD10, also called common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA), was recently found to be expressed in nonhematopoietic tissues. Although CD10 was also identified in human breast myoepithelial cells, its availability of immunohistochemistry on paraffin sections has not been examined so far. In the present study, we demonstrated CD10 immunohistochemically on paraffin sections of both normal and pathological breast tissues, comparing its staining patterns to those of smooth muscle actin (SMA), which is now commonly used to highlight myoepithelium. CD10 was consistently positive in normal breast myoepithelial cells. CD10 also clearly highlighted myoepithelial cells in intraductal papilloma, adenosis, ductal hyperplasia, fibroadenoma, and phyllodes tumor as well as SMA did. In atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ, continuous, discontinuous, and totally negative stainings of both CD10 and SMA were noted, depending on foci of neoplastic cell nests. However, both stainings clearly demonstrated myoepithelial cells of cancerized acini, being useful in differentiating lobular cancerization from microinvasion. Because SMA was also positive in normal vessels and spindle-shaped stromal cells, CD10, which was negative in vessels, was useful in differentiating myoepithelial cells from thin vascular wall in intracystic lesions with delicate papillae. Although background staining of spindle-shaped stromal cells was also noted in CD10, the positive cell number was less, and the signal was weaker than that of SMA. The absence of myoepithelial cells in invasive ductal carcinomas was more clearly highlighted by CD10 than SMA. We concluded that CD10 could be another useful marker of breast myoepithelial cells on paraffin sections. Combination of CD10 and SMA will provide more sophisticated information about presence or absence of myoepithelial cells in confusing breast lesions. SN - 0893-3952 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11950913/Availability_of_CD10_immunohistochemistry_as_a_marker_of_breast_myoepithelial_cells_on_paraffin_sections_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/modpathol.3880536 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -