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'Real' epidemiology of varicose veins and chronic venous diseases: the San Valentino Vascular Screening Project.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and incidence of venous diseases and the role of concomitant/risk factors for varicose veins (VV) or chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). The study was based in San Valentino in Central Italy and was a real whole-population study. The study included 30,000 subjects in eight villages/towns evaluated with clinical assessment and duplex scanning. The global prevalence of VV was 7%; for CVI, the prevalence was 0.86% with 0.48% of ulcers. Incidence (new cases per year) was 0.22% for VV and 0.18% for CVI; 34% of patients with venous disease had never been seen or evaluated. The distribution of VV and CVI in comparison with duplex-detected incompetence (DI) indicates that 12% of subjects had only VV (no DI), 2% had DI but no VV, 7.5% had DI associated with VV, 2% apparent CVI without DI, 3% DI only (without CVI), and 1.6% both CVI and DI. VV associated with DI are rapidly progressive and CVI associated with DI often progresses to ulceration (22% in 6 years). VV without significant DI (3%) and venous dilatation without DI tend to remain at the same stage without progression for a lengthy time. New cases per year appear to have a greater increase in the working population (particularly CVI) possibly as a consequence of trauma during the working period. In older age (>80 years), the incidence of CVI tends to decrease. Ulcers increase in number with age. Only 22% of ulcers can be defined as venous (due to venous hypertension, increased ambulatory venous pressure, shorter refilling time, obstruction and DI). Medical advice for VV or CVI is requested in 164 subjects of 1,000 in the population. In 39 of 1,000, there is a problem but no medical advice is requested and in only 61 of 1,000, the venous problem is real. In VV in 78% of limbs, there is only reflux, in 8% only obstruction, and in 14% both. In CVI, 58% of limbs have reflux, 23% obstruction, and 19% both. In conclusion, VV and CVI are more common with increasing age. The increase with age is linear. There was no important difference between males and females. These results are the basis for future real, whole population studies to evaluate VV and CVI.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    San Valentino Vascular Screening Project, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Chieti University, Italy.

    , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    Angiology 53:2 pg 119-30

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Age Factors
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Child
    Child Welfare
    Child, Preschool
    Chronic Disease
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Incidence
    Infant
    Infant Welfare
    Infant, Newborn
    Italy
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Prevalence
    Random Allocation
    Risk Factors
    Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex
    Varicose Veins
    Venous Insufficiency
    Venous Pressure

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Evaluation Studies
    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11952101

    Citation

    Cesarone, M R., et al. "'Real' Epidemiology of Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Diseases: the San Valentino Vascular Screening Project." Angiology, vol. 53, no. 2, 2002, pp. 119-30.
    Cesarone MR, Belcaro G, Nicolaides AN, et al. 'Real' epidemiology of varicose veins and chronic venous diseases: the San Valentino Vascular Screening Project. Angiology. 2002;53(2):119-30.
    Cesarone, M. R., Belcaro, G., Nicolaides, A. N., Geroulakos, G., Griffin, M., Incandela, L., ... Veller, M. (2002). 'Real' epidemiology of varicose veins and chronic venous diseases: the San Valentino Vascular Screening Project. Angiology, 53(2), pp. 119-30.
    Cesarone MR, et al. 'Real' Epidemiology of Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Diseases: the San Valentino Vascular Screening Project. Angiology. 2002;53(2):119-30. PubMed PMID: 11952101.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - 'Real' epidemiology of varicose veins and chronic venous diseases: the San Valentino Vascular Screening Project. AU - Cesarone,M R, AU - Belcaro,G, AU - Nicolaides,A N, AU - Geroulakos,G, AU - Griffin,M, AU - Incandela,L, AU - De,Sanctis M T, AU - Sabetai,M, AU - Geroulakos,G, AU - Agus,G, AU - Bavera,P, AU - Ippolito,E, AU - Leng,G, AU - Di,Renzo A, AU - Cazaubon,M, AU - Vasdekis,S, AU - Christopoulos,D, AU - Veller,M, PY - 2002/4/16/pubmed PY - 2002/5/2/medline PY - 2002/4/16/entrez SP - 119 EP - 30 JF - Angiology JO - Angiology VL - 53 IS - 2 N2 - The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and incidence of venous diseases and the role of concomitant/risk factors for varicose veins (VV) or chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). The study was based in San Valentino in Central Italy and was a real whole-population study. The study included 30,000 subjects in eight villages/towns evaluated with clinical assessment and duplex scanning. The global prevalence of VV was 7%; for CVI, the prevalence was 0.86% with 0.48% of ulcers. Incidence (new cases per year) was 0.22% for VV and 0.18% for CVI; 34% of patients with venous disease had never been seen or evaluated. The distribution of VV and CVI in comparison with duplex-detected incompetence (DI) indicates that 12% of subjects had only VV (no DI), 2% had DI but no VV, 7.5% had DI associated with VV, 2% apparent CVI without DI, 3% DI only (without CVI), and 1.6% both CVI and DI. VV associated with DI are rapidly progressive and CVI associated with DI often progresses to ulceration (22% in 6 years). VV without significant DI (3%) and venous dilatation without DI tend to remain at the same stage without progression for a lengthy time. New cases per year appear to have a greater increase in the working population (particularly CVI) possibly as a consequence of trauma during the working period. In older age (>80 years), the incidence of CVI tends to decrease. Ulcers increase in number with age. Only 22% of ulcers can be defined as venous (due to venous hypertension, increased ambulatory venous pressure, shorter refilling time, obstruction and DI). Medical advice for VV or CVI is requested in 164 subjects of 1,000 in the population. In 39 of 1,000, there is a problem but no medical advice is requested and in only 61 of 1,000, the venous problem is real. In VV in 78% of limbs, there is only reflux, in 8% only obstruction, and in 14% both. In CVI, 58% of limbs have reflux, 23% obstruction, and 19% both. In conclusion, VV and CVI are more common with increasing age. The increase with age is linear. There was no important difference between males and females. These results are the basis for future real, whole population studies to evaluate VV and CVI. SN - 0003-3197 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11952101/'Real'_epidemiology_of_varicose_veins_and_chronic_venous_diseases:_the_San_Valentino_Vascular_Screening_Project_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/000331970205300201?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -