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A cognitive-behavioural symptom management programme as an adjunct in psoriasis therapy.
Br J Dermatol 2002; 146(3):458-65BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Patients with psoriasis may experience significant psychological and social disabilities. Stress or distress are proposed aggravators of the disease process in psoriasis. Preliminary studies to date have suggested that adjunctive psychological therapies may be effective in the clinical management of psoriasis.

OBJECTIVES

To examine whether a 6-week multidisciplinary management approach, the Psoriasis Symptom Management Programme (PSMP) for patients with psoriasis improves clinical severity of psoriasis and its associated psychological distress and disability.

METHODS

In a case-control study, patients with psoriasis attending an out-patient psoriasis specialty clinic chose to receive standard psoriasis treatment alone (n = 53) or to enter the PSMP as an adjunct to standard therapy (n = 40). They were assessed at baseline, at the end of the 6-week PSMP and after 6 months follow-up.

RESULTS

As compared with standard treatment alone, analysis of covariance indicated that participation in the PSMP resulted in a greater reduction in clinical severity of psoriasis (P = 0.001), anxiety (P = 0.001), depression (P = 0.001), psoriasis-related stress (P = 0.001) and disability (P = 0.04) at 6 weeks and 6 months follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

The management of the physical aspects of psoriasis and its psychological effects are significantly improved for patients who opt for a 6-week integrated multidisciplinary approach. Furthermore, the techniques learnt by participation in the PSMP facilitate continued control of psoriasis for at least 6 months.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dermatology Centre, University of Manchester School of Medicine, Manchester M6 8HD, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11952546

Citation

Fortune, D G., et al. "A Cognitive-behavioural Symptom Management Programme as an Adjunct in Psoriasis Therapy." The British Journal of Dermatology, vol. 146, no. 3, 2002, pp. 458-65.
Fortune DG, Richards HL, Kirby B, et al. A cognitive-behavioural symptom management programme as an adjunct in psoriasis therapy. Br J Dermatol. 2002;146(3):458-65.
Fortune, D. G., Richards, H. L., Kirby, B., Bowcock, S., Main, C. J., & Griffiths, C. E. (2002). A cognitive-behavioural symptom management programme as an adjunct in psoriasis therapy. The British Journal of Dermatology, 146(3), pp. 458-65.
Fortune DG, et al. A Cognitive-behavioural Symptom Management Programme as an Adjunct in Psoriasis Therapy. Br J Dermatol. 2002;146(3):458-65. PubMed PMID: 11952546.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A cognitive-behavioural symptom management programme as an adjunct in psoriasis therapy. AU - Fortune,D G, AU - Richards,H L, AU - Kirby,B, AU - Bowcock,S, AU - Main,C J, AU - Griffiths,C E M, PY - 2002/4/16/pubmed PY - 2002/5/8/medline PY - 2002/4/16/entrez SP - 458 EP - 65 JF - The British journal of dermatology JO - Br. J. Dermatol. VL - 146 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Patients with psoriasis may experience significant psychological and social disabilities. Stress or distress are proposed aggravators of the disease process in psoriasis. Preliminary studies to date have suggested that adjunctive psychological therapies may be effective in the clinical management of psoriasis. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether a 6-week multidisciplinary management approach, the Psoriasis Symptom Management Programme (PSMP) for patients with psoriasis improves clinical severity of psoriasis and its associated psychological distress and disability. METHODS: In a case-control study, patients with psoriasis attending an out-patient psoriasis specialty clinic chose to receive standard psoriasis treatment alone (n = 53) or to enter the PSMP as an adjunct to standard therapy (n = 40). They were assessed at baseline, at the end of the 6-week PSMP and after 6 months follow-up. RESULTS: As compared with standard treatment alone, analysis of covariance indicated that participation in the PSMP resulted in a greater reduction in clinical severity of psoriasis (P = 0.001), anxiety (P = 0.001), depression (P = 0.001), psoriasis-related stress (P = 0.001) and disability (P = 0.04) at 6 weeks and 6 months follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The management of the physical aspects of psoriasis and its psychological effects are significantly improved for patients who opt for a 6-week integrated multidisciplinary approach. Furthermore, the techniques learnt by participation in the PSMP facilitate continued control of psoriasis for at least 6 months. SN - 0007-0963 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11952546/full_citation L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0007-0963&date=2002&volume=146&issue=3&spage=458 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -