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Influence of vitamin C supplementation on oxidative and immune changes after an ultramarathon.
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2002 May; 92(5):1970-7.JA

Abstract

The purpose of this randomized study was to measure the influence of vitamin C (n = 15 runners) compared with placebo (n = 13 runners) supplementation on oxidative and immune changes in runners competing in an ultramarathon race. During the 7-day period before the race and on race day, subjects ingested in randomized, double-blind fashion 1,500 mg/day vitamin C or placebo. On race day, blood samples were collected 1 h before race, after 32 km of running, and then again immediately after race. Subjects in both groups maintained an intensity of approximately 75% maximal heart rate throughout the ultramarathon race and ran a mean of 69 km (range: 48-80 km) in 9.8 h (range: 5-12 h). Plasma ascorbic acid was markedly higher in the vitamin C compared with placebo group prerace and rose more strongly in the vitamin C group during the race (postrace: 3.21 +/- 0.29 and 1.28 +/- 0.12 microg/100 microl, respectively, P < 0.001). No significant group or interaction effects were measured for lipid hydroperoxide, F2-isoprostane, immune cell counts, plasma interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-1-receptor antagonist, or IL-8 concentrations, or mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 and IFN-gamma production. These data indicate that vitamin C supplementation in carbohydrate-fed runners does not serve as a countermeasure to oxidative and immune changes during or after a competitive ultramarathon race.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina 28608, USA. niemandc@appstate.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11960947

Citation

Nieman, David C., et al. "Influence of Vitamin C Supplementation On Oxidative and Immune Changes After an Ultramarathon." Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), vol. 92, no. 5, 2002, pp. 1970-7.
Nieman DC, Henson DA, McAnulty SR, et al. Influence of vitamin C supplementation on oxidative and immune changes after an ultramarathon. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2002;92(5):1970-7.
Nieman, D. C., Henson, D. A., McAnulty, S. R., McAnulty, L., Swick, N. S., Utter, A. C., Vinci, D. M., Opiela, S. J., & Morrow, J. D. (2002). Influence of vitamin C supplementation on oxidative and immune changes after an ultramarathon. Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), 92(5), 1970-7.
Nieman DC, et al. Influence of Vitamin C Supplementation On Oxidative and Immune Changes After an Ultramarathon. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2002;92(5):1970-7. PubMed PMID: 11960947.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of vitamin C supplementation on oxidative and immune changes after an ultramarathon. AU - Nieman,David C, AU - Henson,Dru A, AU - McAnulty,Steve R, AU - McAnulty,Lisa, AU - Swick,Nathaniel S, AU - Utter,Alan C, AU - Vinci,Debra M, AU - Opiela,Shannon J, AU - Morrow,Jason D, PY - 2002/4/19/pubmed PY - 2002/6/22/medline PY - 2002/4/19/entrez SP - 1970 EP - 7 JF - Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) JO - J Appl Physiol (1985) VL - 92 IS - 5 N2 - The purpose of this randomized study was to measure the influence of vitamin C (n = 15 runners) compared with placebo (n = 13 runners) supplementation on oxidative and immune changes in runners competing in an ultramarathon race. During the 7-day period before the race and on race day, subjects ingested in randomized, double-blind fashion 1,500 mg/day vitamin C or placebo. On race day, blood samples were collected 1 h before race, after 32 km of running, and then again immediately after race. Subjects in both groups maintained an intensity of approximately 75% maximal heart rate throughout the ultramarathon race and ran a mean of 69 km (range: 48-80 km) in 9.8 h (range: 5-12 h). Plasma ascorbic acid was markedly higher in the vitamin C compared with placebo group prerace and rose more strongly in the vitamin C group during the race (postrace: 3.21 +/- 0.29 and 1.28 +/- 0.12 microg/100 microl, respectively, P < 0.001). No significant group or interaction effects were measured for lipid hydroperoxide, F2-isoprostane, immune cell counts, plasma interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-1-receptor antagonist, or IL-8 concentrations, or mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 and IFN-gamma production. These data indicate that vitamin C supplementation in carbohydrate-fed runners does not serve as a countermeasure to oxidative and immune changes during or after a competitive ultramarathon race. SN - 8750-7587 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11960947/Influence_of_vitamin_C_supplementation_on_oxidative_and_immune_changes_after_an_ultramarathon_ L2 - https://journals.physiology.org/doi/10.1152/japplphysiol.00961.2001?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -