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An intervention study on screening for breast cancer among single African-American women aged 65 and older.
Prev Med. 2002 May; 34(5):536-45.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Older African-American women with single marital status are least likely to use screening procedures. This study aimed to evaluate a breast screening intervention program conducted in this population.

METHODS

Ten public housing complexes were randomly assigned to either the intervention or the control group. African-American women aged 65 and over were recruited into the study if they were widowed, divorced, separated, or never married and did not have a history of breast cancer (n = 325). The intervention program was delivered by lay health educators at the participant's apartment and was designed to increase knowledge about breast screening, reduce psychological problems, and increase support from significant others. Breast-screening-related cognition and behavior were measured at baseline and at 1 and 2 years postintervention.

RESULTS

Comparisons of the preintervention and postintervention measurements showed that while the proportion of women who had a clinical breast examination or mammogram in the preceding year was decreased at 1 year postintervention in the control group, it was increased in the intervention group. However, the differences did not reach a significant level. No consistent patterns could be found in changes of breast self-examination and variables in knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs. When analyses were restricted to women whose significant others had provided information or help on breast screening, results were better, but the differences between the intervention and control groups still did not reach statistical significance.

CONCLUSIONS

These results did not suggest significant effects of an intervention program that used lay health educators to promote breast cancer screening in older single African-American women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey 17033, USA. kzhu@hes.hmc.psu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11969355

Citation

Zhu, Kangmin, et al. "An Intervention Study On Screening for Breast Cancer Among Single African-American Women Aged 65 and Older." Preventive Medicine, vol. 34, no. 5, 2002, pp. 536-45.
Zhu K, Hunter S, Bernard LJ, et al. An intervention study on screening for breast cancer among single African-American women aged 65 and older. Prev Med. 2002;34(5):536-45.
Zhu, K., Hunter, S., Bernard, L. J., Payne-Wilks, K., Roland, C. L., Elam, L. C., Feng, Z., & Levine, R. S. (2002). An intervention study on screening for breast cancer among single African-American women aged 65 and older. Preventive Medicine, 34(5), 536-45.
Zhu K, et al. An Intervention Study On Screening for Breast Cancer Among Single African-American Women Aged 65 and Older. Prev Med. 2002;34(5):536-45. PubMed PMID: 11969355.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An intervention study on screening for breast cancer among single African-American women aged 65 and older. AU - Zhu,Kangmin, AU - Hunter,Sandra, AU - Bernard,Louis J, AU - Payne-Wilks,Kathleen, AU - Roland,Chanel L, AU - Elam,Lloyd C, AU - Feng,Ziding, AU - Levine,Robert S, PY - 2002/4/24/pubmed PY - 2002/6/18/medline PY - 2002/4/24/entrez SP - 536 EP - 45 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 34 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Older African-American women with single marital status are least likely to use screening procedures. This study aimed to evaluate a breast screening intervention program conducted in this population. METHODS: Ten public housing complexes were randomly assigned to either the intervention or the control group. African-American women aged 65 and over were recruited into the study if they were widowed, divorced, separated, or never married and did not have a history of breast cancer (n = 325). The intervention program was delivered by lay health educators at the participant's apartment and was designed to increase knowledge about breast screening, reduce psychological problems, and increase support from significant others. Breast-screening-related cognition and behavior were measured at baseline and at 1 and 2 years postintervention. RESULTS: Comparisons of the preintervention and postintervention measurements showed that while the proportion of women who had a clinical breast examination or mammogram in the preceding year was decreased at 1 year postintervention in the control group, it was increased in the intervention group. However, the differences did not reach a significant level. No consistent patterns could be found in changes of breast self-examination and variables in knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs. When analyses were restricted to women whose significant others had provided information or help on breast screening, results were better, but the differences between the intervention and control groups still did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: These results did not suggest significant effects of an intervention program that used lay health educators to promote breast cancer screening in older single African-American women. SN - 0091-7435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11969355/An_intervention_study_on_screening_for_breast_cancer_among_single_African_American_women_aged_65_and_older_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091743502910169 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -