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Influence of gender and age on calcium oxalate crystal growth inhibition by urine from relatives of stone forming patients.
J Urol. 2002 Jun; 167(6):2372-6.JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

We define the relationships between urine inhibition of calcium oxalate crystal growth and age, gender, urine chemistries and stone formation among relatives of calcium stone forming patients.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We collected 24-hour urine samples from 366 first degree relatives of calcium stone formers. Calcium oxalate crystal growth inhibition was studied using a constant amount of dialyzed urine protein in a seeded crystallization system. Standard stone risk measurements were also performed on the urine, including supersaturation for calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate and uric acid.

RESULTS

By multivariate analysis crystal growth inhibition is strongly inversely related to the amount of protein excreted per day, and the age of the subject. When corrected for protein excretion and age, urine proteins from nonstone forming male subjects inhibited crystal growth more strongly than those from corresponding female subjects. Among stone formers the sex difference was not present.

CONCLUSIONS

Inhibition of calcium oxalate crystal growth is influenced by a complex combination of gender, age, stone formation and assay conditions. The effect of daily protein excretion is most likely a consequence of using a fixed amount of urine protein per assay. The influence of age is significant and unexplained, with the urine of young people (less than 20 years) demonstrating a vigorous ability to inhibit crystallization. In addition, the urine of nonstone forming male relatives appears to have a greater ability to inhibit crystallization than that of nonstone forming female relatives. Further use of this assay in clinical investigations must take age and gender into proper account.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Chicago and LithoLink Corp., Chicago, Illinois, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11992040

Citation

Bergsland, Kristin J., et al. "Influence of Gender and Age On Calcium Oxalate Crystal Growth Inhibition By Urine From Relatives of Stone Forming Patients." The Journal of Urology, vol. 167, no. 6, 2002, pp. 2372-6.
Bergsland KJ, Kinder JM, Asplin JR, et al. Influence of gender and age on calcium oxalate crystal growth inhibition by urine from relatives of stone forming patients. J Urol. 2002;167(6):2372-6.
Bergsland, K. J., Kinder, J. M., Asplin, J. R., Coe, B. J., & Coe, F. L. (2002). Influence of gender and age on calcium oxalate crystal growth inhibition by urine from relatives of stone forming patients. The Journal of Urology, 167(6), 2372-6.
Bergsland KJ, et al. Influence of Gender and Age On Calcium Oxalate Crystal Growth Inhibition By Urine From Relatives of Stone Forming Patients. J Urol. 2002;167(6):2372-6. PubMed PMID: 11992040.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of gender and age on calcium oxalate crystal growth inhibition by urine from relatives of stone forming patients. AU - Bergsland,Kristin J, AU - Kinder,Jennifer M, AU - Asplin,John R, AU - Coe,Brian J, AU - Coe,Fredric L, PY - 2002/5/7/pubmed PY - 2002/6/18/medline PY - 2002/5/7/entrez SP - 2372 EP - 6 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J Urol VL - 167 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: We define the relationships between urine inhibition of calcium oxalate crystal growth and age, gender, urine chemistries and stone formation among relatives of calcium stone forming patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We collected 24-hour urine samples from 366 first degree relatives of calcium stone formers. Calcium oxalate crystal growth inhibition was studied using a constant amount of dialyzed urine protein in a seeded crystallization system. Standard stone risk measurements were also performed on the urine, including supersaturation for calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate and uric acid. RESULTS: By multivariate analysis crystal growth inhibition is strongly inversely related to the amount of protein excreted per day, and the age of the subject. When corrected for protein excretion and age, urine proteins from nonstone forming male subjects inhibited crystal growth more strongly than those from corresponding female subjects. Among stone formers the sex difference was not present. CONCLUSIONS: Inhibition of calcium oxalate crystal growth is influenced by a complex combination of gender, age, stone formation and assay conditions. The effect of daily protein excretion is most likely a consequence of using a fixed amount of urine protein per assay. The influence of age is significant and unexplained, with the urine of young people (less than 20 years) demonstrating a vigorous ability to inhibit crystallization. In addition, the urine of nonstone forming male relatives appears to have a greater ability to inhibit crystallization than that of nonstone forming female relatives. Further use of this assay in clinical investigations must take age and gender into proper account. SN - 0022-5347 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11992040/Influence_of_gender_and_age_on_calcium_oxalate_crystal_growth_inhibition_by_urine_from_relatives_of_stone_forming_patients_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-5347(05)64987-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -