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Familial cancer aggregation and the risk of lung cancer.

Abstract

CONTEXT

Around 90% of lung cancer worldwide is attributable to cigarette smoking, although less than 20% of cigarette smokers develop lung cancer. Other factors such as diet, chronic lung diseases, occupation and possibly environmental agents also contribute to this cancer. Genetic factors seem to play a role in lung cancer, but the precise characteristics influencing lung cancer susceptibility are not known, since genetic factors are easily obscured by the strong environmental determinants of lung cancer, particularly smoking.

OBJECTIVE

To estimate the effect that cancer occurrence among first-degree relatives has on the risk of lung cancer.

DESIGN

Hospital-based case-control study.

SETTING

The metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil.

PARTICIPANTS

334 incident lung cancer cases and 578 controls matched by hospitals.

MAIN MEASUREMENTS

By means of a structured questionnaire, cases and controls were interviewed about cancer occurrence in first-degree relatives, tobacco smoking, exposure to passive smoking, occupation, migration and socioeconomic status. Non-conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the risk of familial cancer aggregation, the effect of cancer in first-degree relatives and smoking in conjunction, and for controlling confounders.

RESULTS

The adjusted odds ratio (OR) revealed a slight, but not statistically significant, excess risk of lung cancer for subjects with a history of lung cancer in relatives (OR 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50 - 2.92). The same was found among those with a history of other tobacco-related cancers in relatives (OR 1.36; 95% CI 0.87 - 2.14). A step gradient effect was observed regarding lung cancer risk, in accordance with increases in the number of pack-years of cigarette consumption. An interaction between familial cancer aggregation and tobacco smoking was detected.

CONCLUSIONS

A mildly elevated risk of lung cancer among persons with a positive history of lung and other tobacco-related cancers was observed. The finding of an interaction between the variables of familial cancer aggregation and smoking suggests that familial cancer aggregation could be considered as a marker of susceptibility, increasing the risk of lung cancer among smokers. These results improve our knowledge of lung carcinogenesis and can guide future cancer genetic studies.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Public Health School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. wunsch@usp.br

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Brazil
    Case-Control Studies
    Confidence Intervals
    Female
    Genetic Predisposition to Disease
    Humans
    Incidence
    Logistic Models
    Lung Neoplasms
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Odds Ratio
    Risk Factors
    Smoking
    Urban Population

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11994771

    Citation

    Wünsch-Filho, Victor, et al. "Familial Cancer Aggregation and the Risk of Lung Cancer." Sao Paulo Medical Journal = Revista Paulista De Medicina, vol. 120, no. 2, 2002, pp. 38-44.
    Wünsch-Filho V, Boffetta P, Colin D, et al. Familial cancer aggregation and the risk of lung cancer. Sao Paulo Med J. 2002;120(2):38-44.
    Wünsch-Filho, V., Boffetta, P., Colin, D., & Moncau, J. E. (2002). Familial cancer aggregation and the risk of lung cancer. Sao Paulo Medical Journal = Revista Paulista De Medicina, 120(2), pp. 38-44.
    Wünsch-Filho V, et al. Familial Cancer Aggregation and the Risk of Lung Cancer. Sao Paulo Med J. 2002 Mar 7;120(2):38-44. PubMed PMID: 11994771.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Familial cancer aggregation and the risk of lung cancer. AU - Wünsch-Filho,Victor, AU - Boffetta,Paolo, AU - Colin,Didier, AU - Moncau,José Eduardo, PY - 2002/5/8/pubmed PY - 2002/12/21/medline PY - 2002/5/8/entrez SP - 38 EP - 44 JF - Sao Paulo medical journal = Revista paulista de medicina JO - Sao Paulo Med J VL - 120 IS - 2 N2 - CONTEXT: Around 90% of lung cancer worldwide is attributable to cigarette smoking, although less than 20% of cigarette smokers develop lung cancer. Other factors such as diet, chronic lung diseases, occupation and possibly environmental agents also contribute to this cancer. Genetic factors seem to play a role in lung cancer, but the precise characteristics influencing lung cancer susceptibility are not known, since genetic factors are easily obscured by the strong environmental determinants of lung cancer, particularly smoking. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the effect that cancer occurrence among first-degree relatives has on the risk of lung cancer. DESIGN: Hospital-based case-control study. SETTING: The metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: 334 incident lung cancer cases and 578 controls matched by hospitals. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: By means of a structured questionnaire, cases and controls were interviewed about cancer occurrence in first-degree relatives, tobacco smoking, exposure to passive smoking, occupation, migration and socioeconomic status. Non-conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the risk of familial cancer aggregation, the effect of cancer in first-degree relatives and smoking in conjunction, and for controlling confounders. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratio (OR) revealed a slight, but not statistically significant, excess risk of lung cancer for subjects with a history of lung cancer in relatives (OR 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50 - 2.92). The same was found among those with a history of other tobacco-related cancers in relatives (OR 1.36; 95% CI 0.87 - 2.14). A step gradient effect was observed regarding lung cancer risk, in accordance with increases in the number of pack-years of cigarette consumption. An interaction between familial cancer aggregation and tobacco smoking was detected. CONCLUSIONS: A mildly elevated risk of lung cancer among persons with a positive history of lung and other tobacco-related cancers was observed. The finding of an interaction between the variables of familial cancer aggregation and smoking suggests that familial cancer aggregation could be considered as a marker of susceptibility, increasing the risk of lung cancer among smokers. These results improve our knowledge of lung carcinogenesis and can guide future cancer genetic studies. SN - 1516-3180 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11994771/Familial_cancer_aggregation_and_the_risk_of_lung_cancer_ L2 - http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1516-31802002000200003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -