Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of depression in dementia patients in chronic care facilities in the last six months of life.
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2002 May; 17(5):464-72.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of depression among dementia patients and normal controls in chronic care facilities in the last six months of life.

METHOD

We reviewed perimortal data concerning dementia severity, depressive symptoms and diagnoses, and medication use for 279 dementia patients and 24 normal controls brought to autopsy through an Alzheimer's Disease Resource Center.

RESULTS

Major depression was highly prevalent among both dementia patients and normal controls in chronic care facilities in the last six months of life. This depression was under-diagnosed by physicians. Documentation of depressive symptoms by medical support staff has improved over time. However, physician diagnosis of depression has not improved. Recognition of depression was significantly lower for patients with severe dementia. Depression was under-treated in both dementia patients and normal controls, although treatment rates may be increasing. Anxiolytics and hypnotics were often used in lieu of, or in addition to, antidepressant therapy.

CONCLUSIONS

Major depression was highly prevalent in both dementia patients and normal controls, indicating that depression is an important issue for the elderly in the last six months of life irrespective of cognitive status. Under-diagnosis of depression may be an important clinical issue. As physician diagnosis of depression has not improved with time, further physician training and/or awareness initiatives may be warranted. Depression, a treatable cause of excess morbidity and mortality, was undertreated in all groups studied. However, treatment rates may be improving. The prevalent use of anxiolytics and hypnotics for depressed patients is problematic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11994936

Citation

Evers, Martin M., et al. "The Prevalence, Diagnosis and Treatment of Depression in Dementia Patients in Chronic Care Facilities in the Last Six Months of Life." International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 17, no. 5, 2002, pp. 464-72.
Evers MM, Samuels SC, Lantz M, et al. The prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of depression in dementia patients in chronic care facilities in the last six months of life. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2002;17(5):464-72.
Evers, M. M., Samuels, S. C., Lantz, M., Khan, K., Brickman, A. M., & Marin, D. B. (2002). The prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of depression in dementia patients in chronic care facilities in the last six months of life. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 17(5), 464-72.
Evers MM, et al. The Prevalence, Diagnosis and Treatment of Depression in Dementia Patients in Chronic Care Facilities in the Last Six Months of Life. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2002;17(5):464-72. PubMed PMID: 11994936.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of depression in dementia patients in chronic care facilities in the last six months of life. AU - Evers,Martin M, AU - Samuels,Steven C, AU - Lantz,Melinda, AU - Khan,Khalid, AU - Brickman,Adam M, AU - Marin,Deborah B, PY - 2002/5/8/pubmed PY - 2002/7/4/medline PY - 2002/5/8/entrez SP - 464 EP - 72 JF - International journal of geriatric psychiatry JO - Int J Geriatr Psychiatry VL - 17 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of depression among dementia patients and normal controls in chronic care facilities in the last six months of life. METHOD: We reviewed perimortal data concerning dementia severity, depressive symptoms and diagnoses, and medication use for 279 dementia patients and 24 normal controls brought to autopsy through an Alzheimer's Disease Resource Center. RESULTS: Major depression was highly prevalent among both dementia patients and normal controls in chronic care facilities in the last six months of life. This depression was under-diagnosed by physicians. Documentation of depressive symptoms by medical support staff has improved over time. However, physician diagnosis of depression has not improved. Recognition of depression was significantly lower for patients with severe dementia. Depression was under-treated in both dementia patients and normal controls, although treatment rates may be increasing. Anxiolytics and hypnotics were often used in lieu of, or in addition to, antidepressant therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Major depression was highly prevalent in both dementia patients and normal controls, indicating that depression is an important issue for the elderly in the last six months of life irrespective of cognitive status. Under-diagnosis of depression may be an important clinical issue. As physician diagnosis of depression has not improved with time, further physician training and/or awareness initiatives may be warranted. Depression, a treatable cause of excess morbidity and mortality, was undertreated in all groups studied. However, treatment rates may be improving. The prevalent use of anxiolytics and hypnotics for depressed patients is problematic. SN - 0885-6230 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11994936/The_prevalence_diagnosis_and_treatment_of_depression_in_dementia_patients_in_chronic_care_facilities_in_the_last_six_months_of_life_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.634 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -