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Knowledge of bat rabies and human exposure among United States cavers.
Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 May; 8(5):532-4.EI

Abstract

We surveyed cavers who attended the National Speleological Society convention in June 2000. Fifteen percent of respondents did not consider a bat bite a risk for acquiring rabies; only 20% had received preexposure prophylaxis against the disease. An under-appreciation of the risk for rabies from bat bites may explain the preponderance of human rabies viruses caused by variant strains associated with bats in the United States.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rabies Section, Viral and Ricksettial Zoonoses Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11996694

Citation

Gibbons, Robert V., et al. "Knowledge of Bat Rabies and Human Exposure Among United States Cavers." Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 8, no. 5, 2002, pp. 532-4.
Gibbons RV, Holman RC, Mosberg SR, et al. Knowledge of bat rabies and human exposure among United States cavers. Emerg Infect Dis. 2002;8(5):532-4.
Gibbons, R. V., Holman, R. C., Mosberg, S. R., & Rupprecht, C. E. (2002). Knowledge of bat rabies and human exposure among United States cavers. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 8(5), 532-4.
Gibbons RV, et al. Knowledge of Bat Rabies and Human Exposure Among United States Cavers. Emerg Infect Dis. 2002;8(5):532-4. PubMed PMID: 11996694.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Knowledge of bat rabies and human exposure among United States cavers. AU - Gibbons,Robert V, AU - Holman,Robert C, AU - Mosberg,Stephen R, AU - Rupprecht,Charles E, PY - 2002/5/9/pubmed PY - 2002/6/12/medline PY - 2002/5/9/entrez SP - 532 EP - 4 JF - Emerging infectious diseases JO - Emerg Infect Dis VL - 8 IS - 5 N2 - We surveyed cavers who attended the National Speleological Society convention in June 2000. Fifteen percent of respondents did not consider a bat bite a risk for acquiring rabies; only 20% had received preexposure prophylaxis against the disease. An under-appreciation of the risk for rabies from bat bites may explain the preponderance of human rabies viruses caused by variant strains associated with bats in the United States. SN - 1080-6040 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11996694/Knowledge_of_bat_rabies_and_human_exposure_among_United_States_cavers_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/11996694/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -