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The regulation of explicit and implicit race bias: the role of motivations to respond without prejudice.
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2002 May; 82(5):835-48.JP

Abstract

Three studies examined the moderating role of motivations to respond without prejudice (e.g., internal and external) in expressions of explicit and implicit race bias. In all studies, participants reported their explicit attitudes toward Blacks. Implicit measures consisted of a sequential priming task (Study 1) and the Implicit Association Test (Studies 2 and 3). Study 3 used a cognitive busyness manipulation to preclude effects of controlled processing on implicit responses. In each study, explicit race bias was moderated by internal motivation to respond without prejudice, whereas implicit race bias was moderated by the interaction of internal and external motivation to respond without prejudice. Specifically, high internal, low external participants exhibited lower levels of implicit race bias than did all other participants. Implications for the development of effective self-regulation of race bias are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 53706-1696, USA. pgdevine@factstaff.wisc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12003481

Citation

Devine, Patricia G., et al. "The Regulation of Explicit and Implicit Race Bias: the Role of Motivations to Respond Without Prejudice." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 82, no. 5, 2002, pp. 835-48.
Devine PG, Plant EA, Amodio DM, et al. The regulation of explicit and implicit race bias: the role of motivations to respond without prejudice. J Pers Soc Psychol. 2002;82(5):835-48.
Devine, P. G., Plant, E. A., Amodio, D. M., Harmon-Jones, E., & Vance, S. L. (2002). The regulation of explicit and implicit race bias: the role of motivations to respond without prejudice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82(5), 835-48.
Devine PG, et al. The Regulation of Explicit and Implicit Race Bias: the Role of Motivations to Respond Without Prejudice. J Pers Soc Psychol. 2002;82(5):835-48. PubMed PMID: 12003481.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The regulation of explicit and implicit race bias: the role of motivations to respond without prejudice. AU - Devine,Patricia G, AU - Plant,E Ashby, AU - Amodio,David M, AU - Harmon-Jones,Eddie, AU - Vance,Stephanie L, PY - 2002/5/11/pubmed PY - 2002/10/31/medline PY - 2002/5/11/entrez SP - 835 EP - 48 JF - Journal of personality and social psychology JO - J Pers Soc Psychol VL - 82 IS - 5 N2 - Three studies examined the moderating role of motivations to respond without prejudice (e.g., internal and external) in expressions of explicit and implicit race bias. In all studies, participants reported their explicit attitudes toward Blacks. Implicit measures consisted of a sequential priming task (Study 1) and the Implicit Association Test (Studies 2 and 3). Study 3 used a cognitive busyness manipulation to preclude effects of controlled processing on implicit responses. In each study, explicit race bias was moderated by internal motivation to respond without prejudice, whereas implicit race bias was moderated by the interaction of internal and external motivation to respond without prejudice. Specifically, high internal, low external participants exhibited lower levels of implicit race bias than did all other participants. Implications for the development of effective self-regulation of race bias are discussed. SN - 0022-3514 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12003481/The_regulation_of_explicit_and_implicit_race_bias:_the_role_of_motivations_to_respond_without_prejudice_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/psp/82/5/835 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -