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A temporal analysis of grasping in the Ebbinghaus illusion: planning versus online control.
Exp Brain Res. 2002 May; 144(2):275-80.EB

Abstract

Recent work has shown that pictorial illusions have a greater effect on perceptual judgements than they do on the visual control of actions, such as object-directed grasping. This dissociation between vision for perception and vision for action is thought to reflect the operation of two separate streams of visual processing in the brain. Glover and Dixon claim, however, that perceptual illusions can influence the control of grasping but that these effects are evident only at early stages of the movement. By the time the action nears its completion any effect of illusions disappears. Glover and Dixon suggest that these results are consistent with what they call a 'planning and control' model of action, in which actions are planned using a context-dependent visual representation but are monitored and corrected online using a context-independent representation. We reanalysed data from an earlier experiment on grasping in the Ebbinghaus illusion in which we showed that maximum grip aperture was unaffected by this size-contrast illusion. When we looked at these data more closely, we found no evidence for an effect of the illusion even at the earliest stages of the movement. These findings support the suggestion that the initial planning of a simple object-directed grasping movement in this illusory context is indeed refractory to the effects of the illusion. This is not to suggest that more deliberate and/or complex movements could not be influenced by contextual information.

Authors+Show Affiliations

CIHR Group on Action and Perception, Department of Psychology, Social Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C2, Canada. jdancker@uwo.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12012166

Citation

Danckert, James A., et al. "A Temporal Analysis of Grasping in the Ebbinghaus Illusion: Planning Versus Online Control." Experimental Brain Research, vol. 144, no. 2, 2002, pp. 275-80.
Danckert JA, Sharif N, Haffenden AM, et al. A temporal analysis of grasping in the Ebbinghaus illusion: planning versus online control. Exp Brain Res. 2002;144(2):275-80.
Danckert, J. A., Sharif, N., Haffenden, A. M., Schiff, K. C., & Goodale, M. A. (2002). A temporal analysis of grasping in the Ebbinghaus illusion: planning versus online control. Experimental Brain Research, 144(2), 275-80.
Danckert JA, et al. A Temporal Analysis of Grasping in the Ebbinghaus Illusion: Planning Versus Online Control. Exp Brain Res. 2002;144(2):275-80. PubMed PMID: 12012166.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A temporal analysis of grasping in the Ebbinghaus illusion: planning versus online control. AU - Danckert,James A, AU - Sharif,Nadder, AU - Haffenden,Angela M, AU - Schiff,Karen C, AU - Goodale,Melvyn A, Y1 - 2002/04/10/ PY - 2001/11/09/received PY - 2002/02/21/accepted PY - 2002/5/16/pubmed PY - 2002/7/4/medline PY - 2002/5/16/entrez SP - 275 EP - 80 JF - Experimental brain research JO - Exp Brain Res VL - 144 IS - 2 N2 - Recent work has shown that pictorial illusions have a greater effect on perceptual judgements than they do on the visual control of actions, such as object-directed grasping. This dissociation between vision for perception and vision for action is thought to reflect the operation of two separate streams of visual processing in the brain. Glover and Dixon claim, however, that perceptual illusions can influence the control of grasping but that these effects are evident only at early stages of the movement. By the time the action nears its completion any effect of illusions disappears. Glover and Dixon suggest that these results are consistent with what they call a 'planning and control' model of action, in which actions are planned using a context-dependent visual representation but are monitored and corrected online using a context-independent representation. We reanalysed data from an earlier experiment on grasping in the Ebbinghaus illusion in which we showed that maximum grip aperture was unaffected by this size-contrast illusion. When we looked at these data more closely, we found no evidence for an effect of the illusion even at the earliest stages of the movement. These findings support the suggestion that the initial planning of a simple object-directed grasping movement in this illusory context is indeed refractory to the effects of the illusion. This is not to suggest that more deliberate and/or complex movements could not be influenced by contextual information. SN - 0014-4819 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12012166/A_temporal_analysis_of_grasping_in_the_Ebbinghaus_illusion:_planning_versus_online_control_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-002-1073-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -