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[Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the horizontal canal. Clinical features in 25 patients].
Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac 2002; 119(2):73-80AO

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To review the clinical features of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the horizontal canal (HC-BPPV).

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Retrospective study (September 1999 to March 2001) of 25 patients with HC-BPPV. Patients complained of positional vertigo associated with direction changing horizontal positional nystagmus, either geotropic or ageotropic.

RESULTS

The horizontal nystagmus was triggered in all patients when rolled to either side in a supine position (head raised 30 degrees) and in 14 patients by the Dix Hallpike manoeuvre. The nystagmus was geotropic in 15 patients and ageotropic in 10. It varies in time in 4 patients with one change in 3 (from geotropic to ageotropic in 2 and ageotropic to geotropic in 1) and 4 changes in 10 days in another patient. In one patient with head trauma, the HC-BPPV was currently associated with ipsilateral posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (PC-BPPV), and its characteristic rotatory-up beat nystagmus. Interestingly, 4 patients had a previous history of ipsilateral PC-BPPV and in 5 others an ipsilateral PC-BPPV occurred after the HC-BPPV. Although spontaneous recovery of HC-BPPV was common in most patients, a 270 degrees "barbecue rotation" or a "prolonged position on the healthy side" was effective in some patients.

CONCLUSION

Patients with positional vertigo should undergo Dix Hallpike positioning and supine lateral head turns as this latter manoeuvre is more efficient to diagnose an HC-BPPV. Both the transformation of the positional horizontal nystagmus (geotropic-ageotropic) and the association with a PC-BPPV support the diagnosis of an HC-BPPV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Service ORL, Hôpital Bellevue, 42055 Saint-Etienne cedex 02, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

fre

PubMed ID

12015491

Citation

Bertholon, P, et al. "[Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo of the Horizontal Canal. Clinical Features in 25 Patients]." Annales D'oto-laryngologie Et De Chirurgie Cervico Faciale : Bulletin De La Societe D'oto-laryngologie Des Hopitaux De Paris, vol. 119, no. 2, 2002, pp. 73-80.
Bertholon P, Faye MB, Tringali S, et al. [Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the horizontal canal. Clinical features in 25 patients]. Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac. 2002;119(2):73-80.
Bertholon, P., Faye, M. B., Tringali, S., & Martin, C. h. (2002). [Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the horizontal canal. Clinical features in 25 patients]. Annales D'oto-laryngologie Et De Chirurgie Cervico Faciale : Bulletin De La Societe D'oto-laryngologie Des Hopitaux De Paris, 119(2), pp. 73-80.
Bertholon P, et al. [Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo of the Horizontal Canal. Clinical Features in 25 Patients]. Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac. 2002;119(2):73-80. PubMed PMID: 12015491.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the horizontal canal. Clinical features in 25 patients]. AU - Bertholon,P, AU - Faye,M B, AU - Tringali,S, AU - Martin,Ch, PY - 2002/5/17/pubmed PY - 2002/9/7/medline PY - 2002/5/17/entrez SP - 73 EP - 80 JF - Annales d'oto-laryngologie et de chirurgie cervico faciale : bulletin de la Societe d'oto-laryngologie des hopitaux de Paris JO - Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac VL - 119 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To review the clinical features of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the horizontal canal (HC-BPPV). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective study (September 1999 to March 2001) of 25 patients with HC-BPPV. Patients complained of positional vertigo associated with direction changing horizontal positional nystagmus, either geotropic or ageotropic. RESULTS: The horizontal nystagmus was triggered in all patients when rolled to either side in a supine position (head raised 30 degrees) and in 14 patients by the Dix Hallpike manoeuvre. The nystagmus was geotropic in 15 patients and ageotropic in 10. It varies in time in 4 patients with one change in 3 (from geotropic to ageotropic in 2 and ageotropic to geotropic in 1) and 4 changes in 10 days in another patient. In one patient with head trauma, the HC-BPPV was currently associated with ipsilateral posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (PC-BPPV), and its characteristic rotatory-up beat nystagmus. Interestingly, 4 patients had a previous history of ipsilateral PC-BPPV and in 5 others an ipsilateral PC-BPPV occurred after the HC-BPPV. Although spontaneous recovery of HC-BPPV was common in most patients, a 270 degrees "barbecue rotation" or a "prolonged position on the healthy side" was effective in some patients. CONCLUSION: Patients with positional vertigo should undergo Dix Hallpike positioning and supine lateral head turns as this latter manoeuvre is more efficient to diagnose an HC-BPPV. Both the transformation of the positional horizontal nystagmus (geotropic-ageotropic) and the association with a PC-BPPV support the diagnosis of an HC-BPPV. SN - 0003-438X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12015491/[Benign_paroxysmal_positional_vertigo_of_the_horizontal_canal__Clinical_features_in_25_patients]_ L2 - http://www.em-consulte.com/retrieve/pii/MDOI-AORL-04-2002-119-2-0003-438X-101019-ART2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -