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Food safety education: what should we be teaching to consumers?
J Nutr Educ. 2001 Mar-Apr; 33(2):108-13.JN

Abstract

Food safety education is most effective when messages are targeted toward changing behaviors most likely to result in foodborne illness. The five major control factors for pathogens are personal hygiene, adequate cooking, avoiding cross-contamination, keeping food at safe temperatures, and avoiding foods from unsafe sources. Pathogens associated with poor personal hygiene have the highest incidence and costs. Inadequate cooking and cross-contamination have lower incidence. Keeping food at safe temperatures and unsafe food sources have the lowest incidence, although costs per case are sometimes very high. We recommend that consumer food safety educators primarily focus on hand washing, adequate cooking, and avoiding cross-contamination. Secondary messages should focus on keeping food at safe temperatures and avoiding food from an unsafe source. Evaluation tools are needed to evaluate self-reported behavior changes. The evaluation questions must focus on salient behaviors that are most likely to result in foodborne illnesses and must withstand rigorous standards of reliability and validity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Nutrition and Food Management, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1295, USA. medeiros.l@osu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12031191

Citation

Medeiros, L C., et al. "Food Safety Education: what Should We Be Teaching to Consumers?" Journal of Nutrition Education, vol. 33, no. 2, 2001, pp. 108-13.
Medeiros LC, Hillers VN, Kendall PA, et al. Food safety education: what should we be teaching to consumers? J Nutr Educ. 2001;33(2):108-13.
Medeiros, L. C., Hillers, V. N., Kendall, P. A., & Mason, A. (2001). Food safety education: what should we be teaching to consumers? Journal of Nutrition Education, 33(2), 108-13.
Medeiros LC, et al. Food Safety Education: what Should We Be Teaching to Consumers. J Nutr Educ. 2001 Mar-Apr;33(2):108-13. PubMed PMID: 12031191.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food safety education: what should we be teaching to consumers? AU - Medeiros,L C, AU - Hillers,V N, AU - Kendall,P A, AU - Mason,A, PY - 2002/5/29/pubmed PY - 2002/8/22/medline PY - 2002/5/29/entrez SP - 108 EP - 13 JF - Journal of nutrition education JO - J Nutr Educ VL - 33 IS - 2 N2 - Food safety education is most effective when messages are targeted toward changing behaviors most likely to result in foodborne illness. The five major control factors for pathogens are personal hygiene, adequate cooking, avoiding cross-contamination, keeping food at safe temperatures, and avoiding foods from unsafe sources. Pathogens associated with poor personal hygiene have the highest incidence and costs. Inadequate cooking and cross-contamination have lower incidence. Keeping food at safe temperatures and unsafe food sources have the lowest incidence, although costs per case are sometimes very high. We recommend that consumer food safety educators primarily focus on hand washing, adequate cooking, and avoiding cross-contamination. Secondary messages should focus on keeping food at safe temperatures and avoiding food from an unsafe source. Evaluation tools are needed to evaluate self-reported behavior changes. The evaluation questions must focus on salient behaviors that are most likely to result in foodborne illnesses and must withstand rigorous standards of reliability and validity. SN - 0022-3182 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12031191/Food_safety_education:_what_should_we_be_teaching_to_consumers L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/foodborneillness.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -