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Multiple archaeal groups mediate methane oxidation in anoxic cold seep sediments.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2002 May 28; 99(11):7663-8.PN

Abstract

No microorganism capable of anaerobic growth on methane as the sole carbon source has yet been cultivated. Consequently, information about these microbes has been inferred from geochemical and microbiological observations of field samples. Stable isotope analysis of lipid biomarkers and rRNA gene surveys have implicated specific microbes in the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here we use combined fluorescent in situ hybridization and secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses, to identify anaerobic methanotrophs in marine methane-seep sediments. The results provide direct evidence for the involvement of at least two distinct archaeal groups (ANME-1 and ANME-2) in AOM at methane seeps. Although both archaeal groups often occurred in direct physical association with bacteria, they also were observed as monospecific aggregations and as single cells. The ANME-1 archaeal group more frequently existed in monospecific aggregations or as single filaments, apparently without a bacterial partner. Bacteria associated with both archaeal groups included, but were not limited to, close relatives of Desulfosarcina species. Isotopic analyses suggest that monospecific archaeal cells and cell aggregates were active in anaerobic methanotrophy, as were multispecies consortia. In total, the data indicate that the microbial species and biotic interactions mediating anaerobic methanotrophy are diverse and complex. The data also clearly show that highly structured ANME-2/Desulfosarcina consortia are not the sole entities responsible for AOM at marine methane seeps. Other microbial groups, including ANME-1 archaea, are capable of anaerobic methane consumption either as single cells, in monospecific aggregates, or in multispecies consortia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA 95039, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12032340

Citation

Orphan, Victoria J., et al. "Multiple Archaeal Groups Mediate Methane Oxidation in Anoxic Cold Seep Sediments." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 99, no. 11, 2002, pp. 7663-8.
Orphan VJ, House CH, Hinrichs KU, et al. Multiple archaeal groups mediate methane oxidation in anoxic cold seep sediments. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2002;99(11):7663-8.
Orphan, V. J., House, C. H., Hinrichs, K. U., McKeegan, K. D., & DeLong, E. F. (2002). Multiple archaeal groups mediate methane oxidation in anoxic cold seep sediments. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 99(11), 7663-8.
Orphan VJ, et al. Multiple Archaeal Groups Mediate Methane Oxidation in Anoxic Cold Seep Sediments. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2002 May 28;99(11):7663-8. PubMed PMID: 12032340.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Multiple archaeal groups mediate methane oxidation in anoxic cold seep sediments. AU - Orphan,Victoria J, AU - House,Christopher H, AU - Hinrichs,Kai-Uwe, AU - McKeegan,Kevin D, AU - DeLong,Edward F, PY - 2002/5/29/pubmed PY - 2002/7/2/medline PY - 2002/5/29/entrez SP - 7663 EP - 8 JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America JO - Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. VL - 99 IS - 11 N2 - No microorganism capable of anaerobic growth on methane as the sole carbon source has yet been cultivated. Consequently, information about these microbes has been inferred from geochemical and microbiological observations of field samples. Stable isotope analysis of lipid biomarkers and rRNA gene surveys have implicated specific microbes in the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here we use combined fluorescent in situ hybridization and secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses, to identify anaerobic methanotrophs in marine methane-seep sediments. The results provide direct evidence for the involvement of at least two distinct archaeal groups (ANME-1 and ANME-2) in AOM at methane seeps. Although both archaeal groups often occurred in direct physical association with bacteria, they also were observed as monospecific aggregations and as single cells. The ANME-1 archaeal group more frequently existed in monospecific aggregations or as single filaments, apparently without a bacterial partner. Bacteria associated with both archaeal groups included, but were not limited to, close relatives of Desulfosarcina species. Isotopic analyses suggest that monospecific archaeal cells and cell aggregates were active in anaerobic methanotrophy, as were multispecies consortia. In total, the data indicate that the microbial species and biotic interactions mediating anaerobic methanotrophy are diverse and complex. The data also clearly show that highly structured ANME-2/Desulfosarcina consortia are not the sole entities responsible for AOM at marine methane seeps. Other microbial groups, including ANME-1 archaea, are capable of anaerobic methane consumption either as single cells, in monospecific aggregates, or in multispecies consortia. SN - 0027-8424 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12032340/Multiple_archaeal_groups_mediate_methane_oxidation_in_anoxic_cold_seep_sediments_ L2 - http://www.pnas.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=12032340 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -