Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The influence of the type of dietary fat on postprandial fat oxidation rates: monounsaturated (olive oil) vs saturated fat (cream).
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Jun; 26(6):814-21.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare postprandial whole-body fat oxidation rates in humans, following high-fat (43% of total energy) mixed breakfast meals, of fixed energy and macronutrient composition, rich in either monounsaturated fat (MUFA) from extra virgin olive oil or saturated fat (SFA) from cream.

DESIGN

Paired comparison of resting metabolic rate (RMR), thermic effect of a meal and substrate oxidation rates following consumption of isocaloric breakfast meals, differing only in the type of fat, administered in random order 1-2 weeks apart.

SUBJECTS

Fourteen male volunteers, body mass index (BMI) in the range 20-32 kg/m(2), aged 24-49 y and resident in Melbourne, Australia, were recruited by advertisement in the local media or by personal contact.

MEASUREMENTS

Body size and composition was determined by anthropometry and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Indirect calorimetry was used to measure RMR, thermic effect of a meal, post-meal total energy expenditure and substrate oxidation rate. Blood pressure and pulse rates were measured with an automated oscillometric system. Fasting and 2 h postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations and the fasting lipid profile were also determined.

RESULTS

In the 5 h following the MUFA breakfast, there was a significantly greater postprandial fat oxidation rate (3.08+/-4.58 g/5 h, P=0.017), and lower postprandial carbohydrate oxidation rate (P=0.025), than after the SFA breakfast. Thermic effect of a meal was significantly higher (55 kJ/5 h, P=0.034) after the MUFA breakfast, in subjects with a high waist circumference (HWC > or = 99 cm) than those with a low waist circumference (LWC<99 cm). This difference was not detected following the SFA breakfast (P=0.910).

CONCLUSION

If postprandial fat oxidation rates are higher after high MUFA, rather than SFA meals, then a simple change to the type of dietary fat consumed might have beneficial effects in curbing weight gain in men consuming a relatively high-fat diet. This may be particularly evident in men with a large waist circumference.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Menzies School of Health Research, Casuarina, Australia. sunil.piers@menzies.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12037652

Citation

Piers, L S., et al. "The Influence of the Type of Dietary Fat On Postprandial Fat Oxidation Rates: Monounsaturated (olive Oil) Vs Saturated Fat (cream)." International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 26, no. 6, 2002, pp. 814-21.
Piers LS, Walker KZ, Stoney RM, et al. The influence of the type of dietary fat on postprandial fat oxidation rates: monounsaturated (olive oil) vs saturated fat (cream). Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002;26(6):814-21.
Piers, L. S., Walker, K. Z., Stoney, R. M., Soares, M. J., & O'Dea, K. (2002). The influence of the type of dietary fat on postprandial fat oxidation rates: monounsaturated (olive oil) vs saturated fat (cream). International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 26(6), 814-21.
Piers LS, et al. The Influence of the Type of Dietary Fat On Postprandial Fat Oxidation Rates: Monounsaturated (olive Oil) Vs Saturated Fat (cream). Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002;26(6):814-21. PubMed PMID: 12037652.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of the type of dietary fat on postprandial fat oxidation rates: monounsaturated (olive oil) vs saturated fat (cream). AU - Piers,L S, AU - Walker,K Z, AU - Stoney,R M, AU - Soares,M J, AU - O'Dea,K, PY - 2001/08/10/received PY - 2001/12/05/revised PY - 2001/12/18/accepted PY - 2002/5/31/pubmed PY - 2002/7/20/medline PY - 2002/5/31/entrez SP - 814 EP - 21 JF - International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord VL - 26 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare postprandial whole-body fat oxidation rates in humans, following high-fat (43% of total energy) mixed breakfast meals, of fixed energy and macronutrient composition, rich in either monounsaturated fat (MUFA) from extra virgin olive oil or saturated fat (SFA) from cream. DESIGN: Paired comparison of resting metabolic rate (RMR), thermic effect of a meal and substrate oxidation rates following consumption of isocaloric breakfast meals, differing only in the type of fat, administered in random order 1-2 weeks apart. SUBJECTS: Fourteen male volunteers, body mass index (BMI) in the range 20-32 kg/m(2), aged 24-49 y and resident in Melbourne, Australia, were recruited by advertisement in the local media or by personal contact. MEASUREMENTS: Body size and composition was determined by anthropometry and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Indirect calorimetry was used to measure RMR, thermic effect of a meal, post-meal total energy expenditure and substrate oxidation rate. Blood pressure and pulse rates were measured with an automated oscillometric system. Fasting and 2 h postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations and the fasting lipid profile were also determined. RESULTS: In the 5 h following the MUFA breakfast, there was a significantly greater postprandial fat oxidation rate (3.08+/-4.58 g/5 h, P=0.017), and lower postprandial carbohydrate oxidation rate (P=0.025), than after the SFA breakfast. Thermic effect of a meal was significantly higher (55 kJ/5 h, P=0.034) after the MUFA breakfast, in subjects with a high waist circumference (HWC > or = 99 cm) than those with a low waist circumference (LWC<99 cm). This difference was not detected following the SFA breakfast (P=0.910). CONCLUSION: If postprandial fat oxidation rates are higher after high MUFA, rather than SFA meals, then a simple change to the type of dietary fat consumed might have beneficial effects in curbing weight gain in men consuming a relatively high-fat diet. This may be particularly evident in men with a large waist circumference. UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12037652/The_influence_of_the_type_of_dietary_fat_on_postprandial_fat_oxidation_rates:_monounsaturated__olive_oil__vs_saturated_fat__cream__ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dietaryfats.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -