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Endocannabinoids and basal ganglia functionality.
Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2002 Feb-Mar; 66(2-3):257-67.PL

Abstract

In recent years, our knowledge on the cannabinoid pharmacology has shown a significant rise in terms of both quantity (more compounds and more targets) and quality (more selective compounds). This allows to consider cannabinoids and related compounds as a promising new line of research for therapeutic treatment of a variety of conditions, such as brain injury, chronic pain, glaucoma, asthma, cancer and AIDS-associated effects and other pathologies. Motor disorders are another promising field for the therapeutic application of cannabinoid-related compounds, since the control of movement is one of the more relevant physiological roles of the endocannabinoid transmission in the brain. There are two pathologies, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's chorea, which are particularly interesting from a clinical point of view due to the direct relationship of endocannabinoids and their receptors with neurons that degenerate in those disorders. However, other neurological pathologies, such as Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis, which are not motor disorders in origin, but present a strong alteration in the control of movement, have also been a subject of interesting research for a cannabinoid therapy. This review will summarize our current knowledge on the role of these endogenous substances in the control of movement and, in particular, on the possible therapeutic usefulness of these compounds in the treatment of motor pathologies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular III, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain. jjfr@med.ucm.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12052041

Citation

Fernández-Ruiz, J, et al. "Endocannabinoids and Basal Ganglia Functionality." Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, vol. 66, no. 2-3, 2002, pp. 257-67.
Fernández-Ruiz J, Lastres-Becker I, Cabranes A, et al. Endocannabinoids and basal ganglia functionality. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2002;66(2-3):257-67.
Fernández-Ruiz, J., Lastres-Becker, I., Cabranes, A., González, S., & Ramos, J. A. (2002). Endocannabinoids and basal ganglia functionality. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, 66(2-3), 257-67.
Fernández-Ruiz J, et al. Endocannabinoids and Basal Ganglia Functionality. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2002 Feb-Mar;66(2-3):257-67. PubMed PMID: 12052041.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Endocannabinoids and basal ganglia functionality. AU - Fernández-Ruiz,J, AU - Lastres-Becker,I, AU - Cabranes,A, AU - González,S, AU - Ramos,J A, PY - 2002/6/8/pubmed PY - 2002/12/7/medline PY - 2002/6/8/entrez SP - 257 EP - 67 JF - Prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and essential fatty acids JO - Prostaglandins Leukot. Essent. Fatty Acids VL - 66 IS - 2-3 N2 - In recent years, our knowledge on the cannabinoid pharmacology has shown a significant rise in terms of both quantity (more compounds and more targets) and quality (more selective compounds). This allows to consider cannabinoids and related compounds as a promising new line of research for therapeutic treatment of a variety of conditions, such as brain injury, chronic pain, glaucoma, asthma, cancer and AIDS-associated effects and other pathologies. Motor disorders are another promising field for the therapeutic application of cannabinoid-related compounds, since the control of movement is one of the more relevant physiological roles of the endocannabinoid transmission in the brain. There are two pathologies, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's chorea, which are particularly interesting from a clinical point of view due to the direct relationship of endocannabinoids and their receptors with neurons that degenerate in those disorders. However, other neurological pathologies, such as Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis, which are not motor disorders in origin, but present a strong alteration in the control of movement, have also been a subject of interesting research for a cannabinoid therapy. This review will summarize our current knowledge on the role of these endogenous substances in the control of movement and, in particular, on the possible therapeutic usefulness of these compounds in the treatment of motor pathologies. SN - 0952-3278 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12052041/Endocannabinoids_and_basal_ganglia_functionality_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0952327801903503 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -