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Dietary iron supplementation enhances DSS-induced colitis and associated colorectal carcinoma development in mice.
Dig Dis Sci 2002; 47(6):1266-78DD

Abstract

Chronic ulcerative colitis (UC) patients frequently require iron supplementation to remedy anemia due to blood loss. However, the effect of iron supplementation on UC-associated carcinogenesis is unknown. In this study, the effect of an iron-enriched diet on dextran sulfate sodium-induced acute and chronic colitis in mice was assessed. In a short-term study, mice administered 1% DSS in the drinking fluid and an AIN76A diet containing increasing levels of iron exhibited dose-dependent increases in the severity of acute UC as compared to mice fed a control diet. A marked increase in iron deposition on the epithelial surface of the colon and in the inflamed areas and immunostaining for iNOS and nitrotyrosine were observed in the animals supplemented with diets containing different levels of iron. In a long-term carcinogenesis experiment, a twofold iron-enriched diet significantly increased colorectal tumor incidence (14/16, 88%) as compared with animals fed the control diet (3/16, 19%; P < 0.001). The present findings have implications for the management of human UC and suggest that dietary iron can enhance UC and its associated carcinogenesis by augmenting oxidative and nitrosative stress.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chemical Biology, College of Pharmacy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway 08854-8020, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12064801

Citation

Seril, Darren N., et al. "Dietary Iron Supplementation Enhances DSS-induced Colitis and Associated Colorectal Carcinoma Development in Mice." Digestive Diseases and Sciences, vol. 47, no. 6, 2002, pp. 1266-78.
Seril DN, Liao J, Ho KL, et al. Dietary iron supplementation enhances DSS-induced colitis and associated colorectal carcinoma development in mice. Dig Dis Sci. 2002;47(6):1266-78.
Seril, D. N., Liao, J., Ho, K. L., Warsi, A., Yang, C. S., & Yang, G. Y. (2002). Dietary iron supplementation enhances DSS-induced colitis and associated colorectal carcinoma development in mice. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 47(6), pp. 1266-78.
Seril DN, et al. Dietary Iron Supplementation Enhances DSS-induced Colitis and Associated Colorectal Carcinoma Development in Mice. Dig Dis Sci. 2002;47(6):1266-78. PubMed PMID: 12064801.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary iron supplementation enhances DSS-induced colitis and associated colorectal carcinoma development in mice. AU - Seril,Darren N, AU - Liao,Jie, AU - Ho,Kwok-Lam K, AU - Warsi,Asim, AU - Yang,Chung S, AU - Yang,Guang-Yu, PY - 2002/6/18/pubmed PY - 2002/6/26/medline PY - 2002/6/18/entrez SP - 1266 EP - 78 JF - Digestive diseases and sciences JO - Dig. Dis. Sci. VL - 47 IS - 6 N2 - Chronic ulcerative colitis (UC) patients frequently require iron supplementation to remedy anemia due to blood loss. However, the effect of iron supplementation on UC-associated carcinogenesis is unknown. In this study, the effect of an iron-enriched diet on dextran sulfate sodium-induced acute and chronic colitis in mice was assessed. In a short-term study, mice administered 1% DSS in the drinking fluid and an AIN76A diet containing increasing levels of iron exhibited dose-dependent increases in the severity of acute UC as compared to mice fed a control diet. A marked increase in iron deposition on the epithelial surface of the colon and in the inflamed areas and immunostaining for iNOS and nitrotyrosine were observed in the animals supplemented with diets containing different levels of iron. In a long-term carcinogenesis experiment, a twofold iron-enriched diet significantly increased colorectal tumor incidence (14/16, 88%) as compared with animals fed the control diet (3/16, 19%; P < 0.001). The present findings have implications for the management of human UC and suggest that dietary iron can enhance UC and its associated carcinogenesis by augmenting oxidative and nitrosative stress. SN - 0163-2116 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12064801/Dietary_iron_supplementation_enhances_DSS_induced_colitis_and_associated_colorectal_carcinoma_development_in_mice_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=12064801.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -