Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Role of acetaldehyde in the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2002 Jun; 26(6):812-7.AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Acetaldehyde has been suggested to mediate some of the effects of ethanol. Acetaldehyde can be produced by the enzyme catalase within the brain after ethanol administration. The catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT) reduces the production of acetaldehyde, and AT administration can reduce a number of ethanol-induced behavioral effects; this suggests the involvement of acetaldehyde in these behaviors. However, a role for acetaldehyde in mediating the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol remains unclear.

METHODS

The contribution of acetaldehyde to the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol was investigated by use of a two-lever drug discrimination paradigm with food reinforcement. Male Long-Evans rats were trained to discriminate water from either 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Stimulus substitution tests were conducted with ethanol (0-2.5 g/kg by gavage) and acetaldehyde (0-300 mg/kg intraperitoneally). A cumulative dose-response procedure was then used to investigate the effects of pretreatments with AT (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg intraperitoneally) on ethanol discrimination.

RESULTS

Acetaldehyde up to doses that decreased response rates (300 mg/kg) did not substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg ethanol. In addition, AT pretreatment did not affect the dose-response curves for ethanol discrimination.

CONCLUSIONS

These results show that exogenous acetaldehyde administration does not produce discriminative stimulus effects that are similar to those of ethanol. Also, pretreatment with the catalase inhibitor did not affect the dose-response curve for ethanol discrimination, and this suggests that endogenously produced acetaldehyde does not contribute to the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol. Together these results suggest that acetaldehyde does not mediate the discriminative stimulus effects of 1.0 to 2.0 g/kg ethanol.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Biologie du Comportement, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-La-Neuve, Belgium.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12068249

Citation

Quertemont, Etienne, and Kathleen A. Grant. "Role of Acetaldehyde in the Discriminative Stimulus Effects of Ethanol." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 26, no. 6, 2002, pp. 812-7.
Quertemont E, Grant KA. Role of acetaldehyde in the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2002;26(6):812-7.
Quertemont, E., & Grant, K. A. (2002). Role of acetaldehyde in the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 26(6), 812-7.
Quertemont E, Grant KA. Role of Acetaldehyde in the Discriminative Stimulus Effects of Ethanol. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2002;26(6):812-7. PubMed PMID: 12068249.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of acetaldehyde in the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol. AU - Quertemont,Etienne, AU - Grant,Kathleen A, PY - 2002/6/18/pubmed PY - 2002/11/26/medline PY - 2002/6/18/entrez SP - 812 EP - 7 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. VL - 26 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Acetaldehyde has been suggested to mediate some of the effects of ethanol. Acetaldehyde can be produced by the enzyme catalase within the brain after ethanol administration. The catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT) reduces the production of acetaldehyde, and AT administration can reduce a number of ethanol-induced behavioral effects; this suggests the involvement of acetaldehyde in these behaviors. However, a role for acetaldehyde in mediating the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol remains unclear. METHODS: The contribution of acetaldehyde to the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol was investigated by use of a two-lever drug discrimination paradigm with food reinforcement. Male Long-Evans rats were trained to discriminate water from either 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Stimulus substitution tests were conducted with ethanol (0-2.5 g/kg by gavage) and acetaldehyde (0-300 mg/kg intraperitoneally). A cumulative dose-response procedure was then used to investigate the effects of pretreatments with AT (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg intraperitoneally) on ethanol discrimination. RESULTS: Acetaldehyde up to doses that decreased response rates (300 mg/kg) did not substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg ethanol. In addition, AT pretreatment did not affect the dose-response curves for ethanol discrimination. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that exogenous acetaldehyde administration does not produce discriminative stimulus effects that are similar to those of ethanol. Also, pretreatment with the catalase inhibitor did not affect the dose-response curve for ethanol discrimination, and this suggests that endogenously produced acetaldehyde does not contribute to the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol. Together these results suggest that acetaldehyde does not mediate the discriminative stimulus effects of 1.0 to 2.0 g/kg ethanol. SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12068249/Role_of_acetaldehyde_in_the_discriminative_stimulus_effects_of_ethanol_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0145-6008&date=2002&volume=26&issue=6&spage=812 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -