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Effects of stress and alcohol on subjective state in humans.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2002 Jun; 26(6):818-26.AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is increasing evidence that stress and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation interact with drugs of abuse and influence drug-taking behaviors. Both studies with laboratory animals and survey data with alcohol users suggest that acute or chronic stressful events increase alcohol intake. One mechanism for the increase in alcohol intake may be that stress alters the subjective effects produced by the drug in ways that enhance the reinforcing properties of alcohol. Therefore, in this study we determined whether an acute social stressor alters subjective responses to ethanol in humans. The stressor was a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Test, an arithmetic task that increases cortisol levels.

METHODS

Twenty male volunteers participated in two laboratory sessions, in which they performed the Trier Social Stress Test on one session and no task on the other session, immediately before consuming a beverage that contained ethanol (0.8 g/kg in juice) or placebo (juice alone). Eleven subjects received ethanol on both sessions, and nine subjects received placebo on both sessions. Primary dependent measures were self-report questionnaires of mood states. Salivary levels of cortisol were obtained to confirm the effectiveness of the stress procedure.

RESULTS

Stress alone produced stimulant-like subjective effects. In the group who received ethanol, stress increased sedative-like effects and decreased stimulant-like effects.

CONCLUSIONS

At this relatively high dose of ethanol, stress increased sedative effects of alcohol and did not increase desire for more alcohol. It is possible that in some individuals, the increased sedative effects after stress may increase the likelihood of consuming more alcohol. The effects of stress on consumption at this, or lower, doses of alcohol remain to be determined.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. asoderpa@yoda.bsd.uchicago.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12068250

Citation

Söderpalm, Anna H V., and Harriet de Wit. "Effects of Stress and Alcohol On Subjective State in Humans." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 26, no. 6, 2002, pp. 818-26.
Söderpalm AH, de Wit H. Effects of stress and alcohol on subjective state in humans. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2002;26(6):818-26.
Söderpalm, A. H., & de Wit, H. (2002). Effects of stress and alcohol on subjective state in humans. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 26(6), 818-26.
Söderpalm AH, de Wit H. Effects of Stress and Alcohol On Subjective State in Humans. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2002;26(6):818-26. PubMed PMID: 12068250.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of stress and alcohol on subjective state in humans. AU - Söderpalm,Anna H V, AU - de Wit,Harriet, PY - 2002/6/18/pubmed PY - 2002/11/26/medline PY - 2002/6/18/entrez SP - 818 EP - 26 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol Clin Exp Res VL - 26 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that stress and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation interact with drugs of abuse and influence drug-taking behaviors. Both studies with laboratory animals and survey data with alcohol users suggest that acute or chronic stressful events increase alcohol intake. One mechanism for the increase in alcohol intake may be that stress alters the subjective effects produced by the drug in ways that enhance the reinforcing properties of alcohol. Therefore, in this study we determined whether an acute social stressor alters subjective responses to ethanol in humans. The stressor was a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Test, an arithmetic task that increases cortisol levels. METHODS: Twenty male volunteers participated in two laboratory sessions, in which they performed the Trier Social Stress Test on one session and no task on the other session, immediately before consuming a beverage that contained ethanol (0.8 g/kg in juice) or placebo (juice alone). Eleven subjects received ethanol on both sessions, and nine subjects received placebo on both sessions. Primary dependent measures were self-report questionnaires of mood states. Salivary levels of cortisol were obtained to confirm the effectiveness of the stress procedure. RESULTS: Stress alone produced stimulant-like subjective effects. In the group who received ethanol, stress increased sedative-like effects and decreased stimulant-like effects. CONCLUSIONS: At this relatively high dose of ethanol, stress increased sedative effects of alcohol and did not increase desire for more alcohol. It is possible that in some individuals, the increased sedative effects after stress may increase the likelihood of consuming more alcohol. The effects of stress on consumption at this, or lower, doses of alcohol remain to be determined. SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12068250/Effects_of_stress_and_alcohol_on_subjective_state_in_humans_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0145-6008&date=2002&volume=26&issue=6&spage=818 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -