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The perils of using host relationships in parasite taxonomy: phylogeny of the Degeeriella complex.
Mol Phylogenet Evol. 2002 May; 23(2):150-7.MP

Abstract

The taxonomy of lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) is often heavily influenced by host taxonomy. The use of host information to define genera of avian lice in the widespread Degeeriella complex has been prevalent but has created problems. Several workers have suggested that genera defined on the basis of host association are not monophyletic. We used sequences of nuclear (elongation factor-1alpha) and mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase I) genes to test the monophyly of several genera in the Degeeriella complex. Parsimony and likelihood analyses of these data indicated that many genera in the Degeeriella complex are not monophyletic, such that species occurring on the same host groups do not form monophyletic groups. Biological features of hosts (including predaceous habits, brood parasitism, and hole nesting) for species in the Degeeriella complex likely provide opportunities for switching of lice between host groups. In addition, dispersal of lice via phoresy on hippoboscid flies also likely provides opportunities for host switching in the Degeeriella complex. This study indicates that the overuse of host taxonomy in louse taxonomy can result in classifications that do not reflect phylogenetic history.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Illinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL 61820, USA. kjohnson@inhs.uiuc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12069547

Citation

Johnson, Kevin P., et al. "The Perils of Using Host Relationships in Parasite Taxonomy: Phylogeny of the Degeeriella Complex." Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, vol. 23, no. 2, 2002, pp. 150-7.
Johnson KP, Weckstein JD, Witt CC, et al. The perils of using host relationships in parasite taxonomy: phylogeny of the Degeeriella complex. Mol Phylogenet Evol. 2002;23(2):150-7.
Johnson, K. P., Weckstein, J. D., Witt, C. C., Faucett, R. C., & Moyle, R. G. (2002). The perils of using host relationships in parasite taxonomy: phylogeny of the Degeeriella complex. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 23(2), 150-7.
Johnson KP, et al. The Perils of Using Host Relationships in Parasite Taxonomy: Phylogeny of the Degeeriella Complex. Mol Phylogenet Evol. 2002;23(2):150-7. PubMed PMID: 12069547.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The perils of using host relationships in parasite taxonomy: phylogeny of the Degeeriella complex. AU - Johnson,Kevin P, AU - Weckstein,Jason D, AU - Witt,Christopher C, AU - Faucett,Robert C, AU - Moyle,Robert G, PY - 2002/6/19/pubmed PY - 2002/10/4/medline PY - 2002/6/19/entrez SP - 150 EP - 7 JF - Molecular phylogenetics and evolution JO - Mol Phylogenet Evol VL - 23 IS - 2 N2 - The taxonomy of lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) is often heavily influenced by host taxonomy. The use of host information to define genera of avian lice in the widespread Degeeriella complex has been prevalent but has created problems. Several workers have suggested that genera defined on the basis of host association are not monophyletic. We used sequences of nuclear (elongation factor-1alpha) and mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase I) genes to test the monophyly of several genera in the Degeeriella complex. Parsimony and likelihood analyses of these data indicated that many genera in the Degeeriella complex are not monophyletic, such that species occurring on the same host groups do not form monophyletic groups. Biological features of hosts (including predaceous habits, brood parasitism, and hole nesting) for species in the Degeeriella complex likely provide opportunities for switching of lice between host groups. In addition, dispersal of lice via phoresy on hippoboscid flies also likely provides opportunities for host switching in the Degeeriella complex. This study indicates that the overuse of host taxonomy in louse taxonomy can result in classifications that do not reflect phylogenetic history. SN - 1055-7903 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12069547/The_perils_of_using_host_relationships_in_parasite_taxonomy:_phylogeny_of_the_Degeeriella_complex_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1055-7903(02)00014-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -