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Phylogenetics and evolution of the eastern Asian-eastern North American disjunct aphid tribe, Hormaphidini (Hemiptera: Aphididae).
Mol Phylogenet Evol. 2002 May; 23(2):257-67.MP

Abstract

A conspicuous biogeographic pattern of the Northern Hemisphere is the disjunct occurrence of related taxa on different continents. Perhaps best studied in plants, this pattern includes disjunct distributions of genera in eastern Asia and eastern North America. Such continental disjunctions are thought to be the remnants of a mostly continuously distributed, mixed mesophytic forest dating to the Miocene, which subsequently became fragmented by geological and climatic changes. Some highly host-specific insects, namely aphids, live on descendants of the mixed mesophytic forest taxa and exhibit the same disjunct distributions as that of their host plants. We estimated the phylogeny of Hormaphidini aphids, which host-alternate between witch-hazel (Hamamelis; an eastern Asian-eastern North American disjunct genus) and birch (Betula). Based on partial nuclear elongation factor 1alpha and mitochondrial tRNA leucine/cytochrome oxidase II sequences, trees inferred from maximum-parsimony and maximum-likelihood showed strong support for two monophyletic genera (Hamamelistes and Hormaphis), each containing a clade of Japanese and a clade of North American species. The estimated divergence dates of Asian and North American clades in both genera was 20-30 million years ago, consistent with the idea that aphids may have experienced the same vicariance events as those of their host plants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology, UT State University, 5305 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, USA. cvond@biology.usu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12069555

Citation

von Dohlen, Carol D., et al. "Phylogenetics and Evolution of the Eastern Asian-eastern North American Disjunct Aphid Tribe, Hormaphidini (Hemiptera: Aphididae)." Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, vol. 23, no. 2, 2002, pp. 257-67.
von Dohlen CD, Kurosu U, Aoki S. Phylogenetics and evolution of the eastern Asian-eastern North American disjunct aphid tribe, Hormaphidini (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Mol Phylogenet Evol. 2002;23(2):257-67.
von Dohlen, C. D., Kurosu, U., & Aoki, S. (2002). Phylogenetics and evolution of the eastern Asian-eastern North American disjunct aphid tribe, Hormaphidini (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 23(2), 257-67.
von Dohlen CD, Kurosu U, Aoki S. Phylogenetics and Evolution of the Eastern Asian-eastern North American Disjunct Aphid Tribe, Hormaphidini (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Mol Phylogenet Evol. 2002;23(2):257-67. PubMed PMID: 12069555.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Phylogenetics and evolution of the eastern Asian-eastern North American disjunct aphid tribe, Hormaphidini (Hemiptera: Aphididae). AU - von Dohlen,Carol D, AU - Kurosu,Utako, AU - Aoki,Shigeyuki, PY - 2002/6/19/pubmed PY - 2002/10/4/medline PY - 2002/6/19/entrez SP - 257 EP - 67 JF - Molecular phylogenetics and evolution JO - Mol Phylogenet Evol VL - 23 IS - 2 N2 - A conspicuous biogeographic pattern of the Northern Hemisphere is the disjunct occurrence of related taxa on different continents. Perhaps best studied in plants, this pattern includes disjunct distributions of genera in eastern Asia and eastern North America. Such continental disjunctions are thought to be the remnants of a mostly continuously distributed, mixed mesophytic forest dating to the Miocene, which subsequently became fragmented by geological and climatic changes. Some highly host-specific insects, namely aphids, live on descendants of the mixed mesophytic forest taxa and exhibit the same disjunct distributions as that of their host plants. We estimated the phylogeny of Hormaphidini aphids, which host-alternate between witch-hazel (Hamamelis; an eastern Asian-eastern North American disjunct genus) and birch (Betula). Based on partial nuclear elongation factor 1alpha and mitochondrial tRNA leucine/cytochrome oxidase II sequences, trees inferred from maximum-parsimony and maximum-likelihood showed strong support for two monophyletic genera (Hamamelistes and Hormaphis), each containing a clade of Japanese and a clade of North American species. The estimated divergence dates of Asian and North American clades in both genera was 20-30 million years ago, consistent with the idea that aphids may have experienced the same vicariance events as those of their host plants. SN - 1055-7903 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12069555/Phylogenetics_and_evolution_of_the_eastern_Asian_eastern_North_American_disjunct_aphid_tribe_Hormaphidini__Hemiptera:_Aphididae__ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1055-7903(02)00025-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -