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Are changes in beliefs and attitudes about sleep related to sleep improvements in the treatment of insomnia?
Behav Res Ther 2002; 40(7):741-52BR

Abstract

Dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep are presumed to play an important mediating role in perpetuating insomnia. The present study evaluated the impact of cognitive-behavioral and pharmacological treatments for insomnia on sleep-related beliefs and attitudes and the relationship between those changes and sleep improvements. The participants were older adults with chronic and primary insomnia. They received cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT), pharmacotherapy (PCT), combined CBT+PCT (COMB), or a medication placebo (PLA). In addition to daily sleep diaries and sleep laboratory measures, the participants completed the dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep scale (DBAS) at baseline and posttreatment, and at 3-, 12- and 24-month follow-up assessments. The results showed that CBT and COMB treatments produced greater improvements of beliefs and attitudes about sleep at posttreatment than PCT and PLA. Reductions of DBAS scores were significantly correlated with improvements of sleep efficiency as measured by daily sleep diaries and by polysomnography. In addition, more adaptive beliefs and attitudes about sleep at posttreatment were associated with better maintenance of sleep improvements at follow-ups. These findings highlight the importance of targeting sleep-related beliefs and attitudes in the treatment of insomnia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ecole de Psychologie, Université Laval, Sainte-Foy, Quebec, Canada. cmorin@psy.ulaval.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12074370

Citation

Morin, C M., et al. "Are Changes in Beliefs and Attitudes About Sleep Related to Sleep Improvements in the Treatment of Insomnia?" Behaviour Research and Therapy, vol. 40, no. 7, 2002, pp. 741-52.
Morin CM, Blais F, Savard J. Are changes in beliefs and attitudes about sleep related to sleep improvements in the treatment of insomnia? Behav Res Ther. 2002;40(7):741-52.
Morin, C. M., Blais, F., & Savard, J. (2002). Are changes in beliefs and attitudes about sleep related to sleep improvements in the treatment of insomnia? Behaviour Research and Therapy, 40(7), pp. 741-52.
Morin CM, Blais F, Savard J. Are Changes in Beliefs and Attitudes About Sleep Related to Sleep Improvements in the Treatment of Insomnia. Behav Res Ther. 2002;40(7):741-52. PubMed PMID: 12074370.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Are changes in beliefs and attitudes about sleep related to sleep improvements in the treatment of insomnia? AU - Morin,C M, AU - Blais,F, AU - Savard,J, PY - 2002/6/21/pubmed PY - 2002/7/20/medline PY - 2002/6/21/entrez SP - 741 EP - 52 JF - Behaviour research and therapy JO - Behav Res Ther VL - 40 IS - 7 N2 - Dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep are presumed to play an important mediating role in perpetuating insomnia. The present study evaluated the impact of cognitive-behavioral and pharmacological treatments for insomnia on sleep-related beliefs and attitudes and the relationship between those changes and sleep improvements. The participants were older adults with chronic and primary insomnia. They received cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT), pharmacotherapy (PCT), combined CBT+PCT (COMB), or a medication placebo (PLA). In addition to daily sleep diaries and sleep laboratory measures, the participants completed the dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep scale (DBAS) at baseline and posttreatment, and at 3-, 12- and 24-month follow-up assessments. The results showed that CBT and COMB treatments produced greater improvements of beliefs and attitudes about sleep at posttreatment than PCT and PLA. Reductions of DBAS scores were significantly correlated with improvements of sleep efficiency as measured by daily sleep diaries and by polysomnography. In addition, more adaptive beliefs and attitudes about sleep at posttreatment were associated with better maintenance of sleep improvements at follow-ups. These findings highlight the importance of targeting sleep-related beliefs and attitudes in the treatment of insomnia. SN - 0005-7967 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12074370/Are_changes_in_beliefs_and_attitudes_about_sleep_related_to_sleep_improvements_in_the_treatment_of_insomnia L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0005-7967(01)00055-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -