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Social class differences in overweight of prepubertal children in northwest Germany.
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Apr; 26(4):566-72.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess social class differences in overweight and health-related behaviours in 5-7-y-old German children.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING

Twenty-nine primary schools in Kiel (inhabitants: 248000), northwest Germany.

SUBJECTS

A total of 1350 German 5-7-y-old children and their parents.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Body mass index (BMI), fat mass and health-related behaviours of the children. Self-reported height and weight of their parents, parental school education as a measure of social class.

RESULTS

The prevalence of overweight (> or = 90th percentile of reference) was 18.5%. There was an inverse social gradient (P < 0.01): the highest fat mass was observed in children from low social class. The odds ratios for overweight reached 3.1 (CI 1.7-5.4) in boys and 2.3 (CI 1.2-4.3) in girls, respectively (low vs high social class). Overweight parents (BMI > or = 25 kg/m2) were more likely to have overweight children. Parental overweight enhanced the inverse social gradient. The prevalence of overweight was 37.5% (low social class) vs 22.9% (high social class) in children from overweight parents, respectively. There was an inverse social gradient in unhealthy behaviours. Parental BMI and physical inactivity were independent risk factors of overweight in children.

CONCLUSIONS

In 5 to 7-y-old children overweight and health-related behaviours are inversely related to social class. Parental overweight enhanced the risk of childhood overweight. The familial effect on body weight is most pronounced in children with low social class. Preventive measures should specifically tackle 'overweight families' from low social class.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institut für Hummanernährung und Lebensmittelkunde, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12075585

Citation

Langnäse, K, et al. "Social Class Differences in Overweight of Prepubertal Children in Northwest Germany." International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 26, no. 4, 2002, pp. 566-72.
Langnäse K, Mast M, Müller MJ. Social class differences in overweight of prepubertal children in northwest Germany. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002;26(4):566-72.
Langnäse, K., Mast, M., & Müller, M. J. (2002). Social class differences in overweight of prepubertal children in northwest Germany. International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 26(4), 566-72.
Langnäse K, Mast M, Müller MJ. Social Class Differences in Overweight of Prepubertal Children in Northwest Germany. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002;26(4):566-72. PubMed PMID: 12075585.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Social class differences in overweight of prepubertal children in northwest Germany. AU - Langnäse,K, AU - Mast,M, AU - Müller,M J, PY - 2002/6/22/pubmed PY - 2002/7/20/medline PY - 2002/6/22/entrez SP - 566 EP - 72 JF - International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Int. J. Obes. Relat. Metab. Disord. VL - 26 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess social class differences in overweight and health-related behaviours in 5-7-y-old German children. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Twenty-nine primary schools in Kiel (inhabitants: 248000), northwest Germany. SUBJECTS: A total of 1350 German 5-7-y-old children and their parents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Body mass index (BMI), fat mass and health-related behaviours of the children. Self-reported height and weight of their parents, parental school education as a measure of social class. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight (> or = 90th percentile of reference) was 18.5%. There was an inverse social gradient (P < 0.01): the highest fat mass was observed in children from low social class. The odds ratios for overweight reached 3.1 (CI 1.7-5.4) in boys and 2.3 (CI 1.2-4.3) in girls, respectively (low vs high social class). Overweight parents (BMI > or = 25 kg/m2) were more likely to have overweight children. Parental overweight enhanced the inverse social gradient. The prevalence of overweight was 37.5% (low social class) vs 22.9% (high social class) in children from overweight parents, respectively. There was an inverse social gradient in unhealthy behaviours. Parental BMI and physical inactivity were independent risk factors of overweight in children. CONCLUSIONS: In 5 to 7-y-old children overweight and health-related behaviours are inversely related to social class. Parental overweight enhanced the risk of childhood overweight. The familial effect on body weight is most pronounced in children with low social class. Preventive measures should specifically tackle 'overweight families' from low social class. UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12075585/Social_class_differences_in_overweight_of_prepubertal_children_in_northwest_Germany_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/obesity.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -