Prime

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Dietary intake of antioxidant nutrients and the risk of incident Alzheimer disease in a biracial community study.

Abstract

CONTEXT

Oxidative processes have been suggested as elements in the development of Alzheimer disease (AD), but whether dietary intake of vitamin E and other antioxidant nutrients prevents its development is unknown.

OBJECTIVE

To examine whether intake of antioxidant nutrients, vitamin E, vitamin C, and beta carotene is associated with incident AD.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS

Prospective study, conducted from 1993 to 2000, of individuals selected in a stratified random sample of community-dwelling residents. The 815 residents 65 years and older were free of AD at baseline and were followed up for a mean of 3.9 years. They completed food frequency questionnaires an average of 1.7 years after baseline.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Incident AD diagnosed in clinical evaluations with standardized criteria.

RESULTS

Increasing vitamin E intake from foods was associated with decreased risk of developing AD after adjustment for age, education, sex, race, APOE epsilon 4, and length of follow-up. Relative risks (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) from lowest to highest quintiles of intake were 1.00, 0.71 (0.24-2.07), 0.62 (0.26-1.45), 0.71 (0.27-1.88), and 0.30 (0.10-0.92) (P for trend =.05). The protective association of vitamin E was observed only among persons who were APOE epsilon 4 negative. Adjustment for other dietary factors reduced the protective association. After adjustment for baseline memory score, the risk was 0.36 (95% CI, 0.11-1.17). Intake of vitamin C, beta carotene, and vitamin E from supplements was not significantly associated with risk of AD.

CONCLUSION

This study suggests that vitamin E from food, but not other antioxidants, may be associated with a reduced risk of AD. Unexpectedly, this association was observed only among individuals without the APOE epsilon 4 allele.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush-Presbyterian-St Luke's Medical Center, 1645 W Jackson, Suite 675, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. mmorris@rush.edu

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    JAMA 287:24 2002 Jun 26 pg 3230-7

    MeSH

    African Continental Ancestry Group
    Aged
    Alzheimer Disease
    Antioxidants
    Apolipoprotein E4
    Apolipoproteins E
    Ascorbic Acid
    Cluster Analysis
    Dietary Supplements
    European Continental Ancestry Group
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Models, Statistical
    Nutrition Assessment
    Oxidative Stress
    Prospective Studies
    Risk
    Vitamin E
    beta Carotene

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12076219

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary intake of antioxidant nutrients and the risk of incident Alzheimer disease in a biracial community study. AU - Morris,Martha Clare, AU - Evans,Denis A, AU - Bienias,Julia L, AU - Tangney,Christine C, AU - Bennett,David A, AU - Aggarwal,Neelum, AU - Wilson,Robert S, AU - Scherr,Paul A, PY - 2002/6/22/pubmed PY - 2002/7/3/medline PY - 2002/6/22/entrez SP - 3230 EP - 7 JF - JAMA JO - JAMA VL - 287 IS - 24 N2 - CONTEXT: Oxidative processes have been suggested as elements in the development of Alzheimer disease (AD), but whether dietary intake of vitamin E and other antioxidant nutrients prevents its development is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether intake of antioxidant nutrients, vitamin E, vitamin C, and beta carotene is associated with incident AD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Prospective study, conducted from 1993 to 2000, of individuals selected in a stratified random sample of community-dwelling residents. The 815 residents 65 years and older were free of AD at baseline and were followed up for a mean of 3.9 years. They completed food frequency questionnaires an average of 1.7 years after baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Incident AD diagnosed in clinical evaluations with standardized criteria. RESULTS: Increasing vitamin E intake from foods was associated with decreased risk of developing AD after adjustment for age, education, sex, race, APOE epsilon 4, and length of follow-up. Relative risks (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) from lowest to highest quintiles of intake were 1.00, 0.71 (0.24-2.07), 0.62 (0.26-1.45), 0.71 (0.27-1.88), and 0.30 (0.10-0.92) (P for trend =.05). The protective association of vitamin E was observed only among persons who were APOE epsilon 4 negative. Adjustment for other dietary factors reduced the protective association. After adjustment for baseline memory score, the risk was 0.36 (95% CI, 0.11-1.17). Intake of vitamin C, beta carotene, and vitamin E from supplements was not significantly associated with risk of AD. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that vitamin E from food, but not other antioxidants, may be associated with a reduced risk of AD. Unexpectedly, this association was observed only among individuals without the APOE epsilon 4 allele. SN - 0098-7484 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12076219/full_citation L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/vol/287/pg/3230 ER -