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Alcohol consumption and the incidence of type II diabetes.
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2002 Jul; 56(7):542-8.JE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

This study examines the relation between alcohol and type II diabetes and the possible mediating effects of HDL-cholesterol and serum insulin.

METHODS

Prospective study of 5221 men aged 40-59 years with no history of coronary heart disease, diabetes, or stroke drawn from general practices in 18 British towns.

RESULTS

During the mean follow up of 16.8 years there were 198 incident cases of type II diabetes. Occasional drinkers were the reference group. A non-linear relation was seen between alcohol intake and age adjusted risk of diabetes, with risk lowest in light and moderate drinkers and highest in heavy drinkers (quadratic trend p=0.03). Further adjustment for body mass index decreased risk in heavy drinkers. After additional adjustment for physical activity, smoking, and (undiagnosed) pre-existing coronary heart disease, only moderate drinkers showed significantly lower risk than occasional drinkers (RR=0.66 95% CI 0.44 to 0.99). Alcohol intake was inversely associated with serum insulin and positively associated with HDL-cholesterol. Adjustment for these factors reduced the "protective" effect in moderate drinkers (adjusted RR=0.73 95% CI 0.48 to 1.10) but the quadratic trend remained significant (p=0.02).

CONCLUSION

There is a non-linear relation between alcohol intake and the risk of type II diabetes. Serum insulin and HDL-cholesterol explained a small amount (20%) of the reduction in risk of type II diabetes associated with moderate drinking. The adverse effect of heavy drinking seemed to be partially mediated through its effect on body weight.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Primary Care and Population Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, UK. goya@pcps.ucl.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12080164

Citation

Wannamethee, S G., et al. "Alcohol Consumption and the Incidence of Type II Diabetes." Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, vol. 56, no. 7, 2002, pp. 542-8.
Wannamethee SG, Shaper AG, Perry IJ, et al. Alcohol consumption and the incidence of type II diabetes. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2002;56(7):542-8.
Wannamethee, S. G., Shaper, A. G., Perry, I. J., & Alberti, K. G. (2002). Alcohol consumption and the incidence of type II diabetes. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 56(7), 542-8.
Wannamethee SG, et al. Alcohol Consumption and the Incidence of Type II Diabetes. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2002;56(7):542-8. PubMed PMID: 12080164.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption and the incidence of type II diabetes. AU - Wannamethee,S G, AU - Shaper,A G, AU - Perry,I J, AU - Alberti,K G M M, PY - 2002/6/25/pubmed PY - 2002/8/1/medline PY - 2002/6/25/entrez SP - 542 EP - 8 JF - Journal of epidemiology and community health JO - J Epidemiol Community Health VL - 56 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: This study examines the relation between alcohol and type II diabetes and the possible mediating effects of HDL-cholesterol and serum insulin. METHODS: Prospective study of 5221 men aged 40-59 years with no history of coronary heart disease, diabetes, or stroke drawn from general practices in 18 British towns. RESULTS: During the mean follow up of 16.8 years there were 198 incident cases of type II diabetes. Occasional drinkers were the reference group. A non-linear relation was seen between alcohol intake and age adjusted risk of diabetes, with risk lowest in light and moderate drinkers and highest in heavy drinkers (quadratic trend p=0.03). Further adjustment for body mass index decreased risk in heavy drinkers. After additional adjustment for physical activity, smoking, and (undiagnosed) pre-existing coronary heart disease, only moderate drinkers showed significantly lower risk than occasional drinkers (RR=0.66 95% CI 0.44 to 0.99). Alcohol intake was inversely associated with serum insulin and positively associated with HDL-cholesterol. Adjustment for these factors reduced the "protective" effect in moderate drinkers (adjusted RR=0.73 95% CI 0.48 to 1.10) but the quadratic trend remained significant (p=0.02). CONCLUSION: There is a non-linear relation between alcohol intake and the risk of type II diabetes. Serum insulin and HDL-cholesterol explained a small amount (20%) of the reduction in risk of type II diabetes associated with moderate drinking. The adverse effect of heavy drinking seemed to be partially mediated through its effect on body weight. SN - 0143-005X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12080164/Alcohol_consumption_and_the_incidence_of_type_II_diabetes_ L2 - http://jech.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=12080164 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -