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Exercise: a behavioral intervention to enhance brain health and plasticity.
Trends Neurosci. 2002 Jun; 25(6):295-301.TN

Abstract

Extensive research on humans suggests that exercise could have benefits for overall health and cognitive function, particularly in later life. Recent studies using animal models have been directed towards understanding the neurobiological bases of these benefits. It is now clear that voluntary exercise can increase levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other growth factors, stimulate neurogenesis, increase resistance to brain insult and improve learning and mental performance. Recently, high-density oligonucleotide microarray analysis has demonstrated that, in addition to increasing levels of BDNF, exercise mobilizes gene expression profiles that would be predicted to benefit brain plasticity processes. Thus, exercise could provide a simple means to maintain brain function and promote brain plasticity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4540, USA. cwcotman@uci.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12086747

Citation

Cotman, Carl W., and Nicole C. Berchtold. "Exercise: a Behavioral Intervention to Enhance Brain Health and Plasticity." Trends in Neurosciences, vol. 25, no. 6, 2002, pp. 295-301.
Cotman CW, Berchtold NC. Exercise: a behavioral intervention to enhance brain health and plasticity. Trends Neurosci. 2002;25(6):295-301.
Cotman, C. W., & Berchtold, N. C. (2002). Exercise: a behavioral intervention to enhance brain health and plasticity. Trends in Neurosciences, 25(6), 295-301.
Cotman CW, Berchtold NC. Exercise: a Behavioral Intervention to Enhance Brain Health and Plasticity. Trends Neurosci. 2002;25(6):295-301. PubMed PMID: 12086747.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exercise: a behavioral intervention to enhance brain health and plasticity. AU - Cotman,Carl W, AU - Berchtold,Nicole C, PY - 2002/6/28/pubmed PY - 2002/7/31/medline PY - 2002/6/28/entrez SP - 295 EP - 301 JF - Trends in neurosciences JO - Trends Neurosci VL - 25 IS - 6 N2 - Extensive research on humans suggests that exercise could have benefits for overall health and cognitive function, particularly in later life. Recent studies using animal models have been directed towards understanding the neurobiological bases of these benefits. It is now clear that voluntary exercise can increase levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other growth factors, stimulate neurogenesis, increase resistance to brain insult and improve learning and mental performance. Recently, high-density oligonucleotide microarray analysis has demonstrated that, in addition to increasing levels of BDNF, exercise mobilizes gene expression profiles that would be predicted to benefit brain plasticity processes. Thus, exercise could provide a simple means to maintain brain function and promote brain plasticity. SN - 0166-2236 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12086747/Exercise:_a_behavioral_intervention_to_enhance_brain_health_and_plasticity_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166-2236(02)02143-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -