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Oral contraceptives and the risk of breast cancer.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It is uncertain whether the use of an oral contraceptive increases the risk of breast cancer later in life, when the incidence of breast cancer is increased. We conducted a population-based, case-control study to determine the risk of breast cancer among former and current users of oral contraceptives.

METHODS

We interviewed women who were 35 to 64 years old. A total of 4575 women with breast cancer and 4682 controls were interviewed. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios as estimates of the relative risk (incidence-density ratios) of breast cancer.

RESULTS

The relative risk was 1.0 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.8 to 1.3) for women who were currently using oral contraceptives and 0.9 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.8 to 1.0) for those who had previously used them. The relative risk did not increase consistently with longer periods of use or with higher doses of estrogen. The results were similar among white and black women. Use of oral contraceptives by women with a family history of breast cancer was not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, nor was the initiation of oral-contraceptive use at a young age.

CONCLUSIONS

Among women from 35 to 64 years of age, current or former oral-contraceptive use was not associated with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA.

    , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    The New England journal of medicine 346:26 2002 Jun 27 pg 2025-32

    MeSH

    Adult
    Body Mass Index
    Breast Neoplasms
    Case-Control Studies
    Contraceptives, Oral
    Female
    Humans
    Logistic Models
    Menopause
    Middle Aged
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12087137

    Citation

    Marchbanks, Polly A., et al. "Oral Contraceptives and the Risk of Breast Cancer." The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 346, no. 26, 2002, pp. 2025-32.
    Marchbanks PA, McDonald JA, Wilson HG, et al. Oral contraceptives and the risk of breast cancer. N Engl J Med. 2002;346(26):2025-32.
    Marchbanks, P. A., McDonald, J. A., Wilson, H. G., Folger, S. G., Mandel, M. G., Daling, J. R., ... Weiss, L. K. (2002). Oral contraceptives and the risk of breast cancer. The New England Journal of Medicine, 346(26), pp. 2025-32.
    Marchbanks PA, et al. Oral Contraceptives and the Risk of Breast Cancer. N Engl J Med. 2002 Jun 27;346(26):2025-32. PubMed PMID: 12087137.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Oral contraceptives and the risk of breast cancer. AU - Marchbanks,Polly A, AU - McDonald,Jill A, AU - Wilson,Hoyt G, AU - Folger,Suzanne G, AU - Mandel,Michele G, AU - Daling,Janet R, AU - Bernstein,Leslie, AU - Malone,Kathleen E, AU - Ursin,Giske, AU - Strom,Brian L, AU - Norman,Sandra A, AU - Wingo,Phyllis A, AU - Burkman,Ronald T, AU - Berlin,Jesse A, AU - Simon,Michael S, AU - Spirtas,Robert, AU - Weiss,Linda K, PY - 2002/6/28/pubmed PY - 2002/7/3/medline PY - 2002/6/28/entrez SP - 2025 EP - 32 JF - The New England journal of medicine JO - N. Engl. J. Med. VL - 346 IS - 26 N2 - BACKGROUND: It is uncertain whether the use of an oral contraceptive increases the risk of breast cancer later in life, when the incidence of breast cancer is increased. We conducted a population-based, case-control study to determine the risk of breast cancer among former and current users of oral contraceptives. METHODS: We interviewed women who were 35 to 64 years old. A total of 4575 women with breast cancer and 4682 controls were interviewed. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios as estimates of the relative risk (incidence-density ratios) of breast cancer. RESULTS: The relative risk was 1.0 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.8 to 1.3) for women who were currently using oral contraceptives and 0.9 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.8 to 1.0) for those who had previously used them. The relative risk did not increase consistently with longer periods of use or with higher doses of estrogen. The results were similar among white and black women. Use of oral contraceptives by women with a family history of breast cancer was not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, nor was the initiation of oral-contraceptive use at a young age. CONCLUSIONS: Among women from 35 to 64 years of age, current or former oral-contraceptive use was not associated with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer. SN - 1533-4406 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12087137/full_citation L2 - https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa013202?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -