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The role of public exposure in moral and nonmoral shame and guilt.
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2002 Jul; 83(1):138-59.JP

Abstract

Although scholarly traditions assume that shame results more from the public exposure of a transgression or incompetence than guilt does, this distinction has little empirical support. Four studies, using either undergraduate participants' responses to hypothetical scenarios, their remembered experiences, or the coding of literary passages, reexamined this issue. Supporting traditional claims, public exposure of both moral (transgressions) and nonmoral (incompetence) experiences was associated more with shame than with guilt. Shame was also more strongly linked with nonmoral experiences of inferiority, suggesting 2 core features of shame: its links with public exposure and with negative self-evaluation. The distinctive features of guilt included remorse, self-blame, and the private feelings associated with a troubled conscience.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington 40506, USA. rhsmit00@pop.uky.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12088123

Citation

Smith, Richard H., et al. "The Role of Public Exposure in Moral and Nonmoral Shame and Guilt." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 83, no. 1, 2002, pp. 138-59.
Smith RH, Webster JM, Parrott WG, et al. The role of public exposure in moral and nonmoral shame and guilt. J Pers Soc Psychol. 2002;83(1):138-59.
Smith, R. H., Webster, J. M., Parrott, W. G., & Eyre, H. L. (2002). The role of public exposure in moral and nonmoral shame and guilt. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 83(1), 138-59.
Smith RH, et al. The Role of Public Exposure in Moral and Nonmoral Shame and Guilt. J Pers Soc Psychol. 2002;83(1):138-59. PubMed PMID: 12088123.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of public exposure in moral and nonmoral shame and guilt. AU - Smith,Richard H, AU - Webster,J Matthew, AU - Parrott,W Gerrod, AU - Eyre,Heidi L, PY - 2002/6/29/pubmed PY - 2003/1/1/medline PY - 2002/6/29/entrez SP - 138 EP - 59 JF - Journal of personality and social psychology JO - J Pers Soc Psychol VL - 83 IS - 1 N2 - Although scholarly traditions assume that shame results more from the public exposure of a transgression or incompetence than guilt does, this distinction has little empirical support. Four studies, using either undergraduate participants' responses to hypothetical scenarios, their remembered experiences, or the coding of literary passages, reexamined this issue. Supporting traditional claims, public exposure of both moral (transgressions) and nonmoral (incompetence) experiences was associated more with shame than with guilt. Shame was also more strongly linked with nonmoral experiences of inferiority, suggesting 2 core features of shame: its links with public exposure and with negative self-evaluation. The distinctive features of guilt included remorse, self-blame, and the private feelings associated with a troubled conscience. SN - 0022-3514 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12088123/The_role_of_public_exposure_in_moral_and_nonmoral_shame_and_guilt_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/psp/83/1/138 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -