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Influence of dietary carbohydrates and glycaemic response on subjective appetite and food intake in healthy elderly persons.
Int J Food Sci Nutr 2002; 53(4):305-16IJ

Abstract

Increased satiety and decreased food intake are reported following the consumption of low glycaemic index (GI) foods, which gradually increase blood glucose. This observation, however, is not uniformly supported and few studies have examined the impact of different GI foods on satiety and intake in the elderly. After an overnight fast, 10 men and 10 women (aged 60-82 years) consumed similar amounts of available carbohydrate as high (glucose drink or potatoes) or low (barley) GI foods or a non-energy placebo drink on four mornings. Blood glucose and subjective appetite were measured throughout a 120 min post-ingestion period, followed by consumption of an ad libitum lunch. Differences in plasma glucose after test food ingestion (glucose > potatoes > barley > placebo; P < 0.03) did not predict subjective appetite or lunch intake. Potatoes increased subjective satiety the most, followed by barley, then glucose, which trended towards greater satiety than placebo. Potatoes led to less hunger than placebo (P = 0.0023) and less prospective consumption than the other three foods (P < 0.0083), and potatoes and barley led to greater fullness than glucose and placebo (P < 0.0001). Lunch intake was decreased, compared with placebo (502 +/- 47 kcal, P < 0.031), by potatoes (405 +/- 40 kcal) and barley (441 +/- 41 kcal); however, only potatoes (41.9 +/- 12.3%) led to greater compensation at lunch for test food ingestion compared with glucose (11.9 +/- 9.5%, P = 0.016). These results suggest that elderly subjects are sensitive to the effects of different foods on subjective appetite and food intake, and that the GI of the foods tested did not predict their effects on satiety and food intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, FitzGerald Building, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E2.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12090026

Citation

Kaplan, Randall J., and Carol E. Greenwood. "Influence of Dietary Carbohydrates and Glycaemic Response On Subjective Appetite and Food Intake in Healthy Elderly Persons." International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, vol. 53, no. 4, 2002, pp. 305-16.
Kaplan RJ, Greenwood CE. Influence of dietary carbohydrates and glycaemic response on subjective appetite and food intake in healthy elderly persons. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2002;53(4):305-16.
Kaplan, R. J., & Greenwood, C. E. (2002). Influence of dietary carbohydrates and glycaemic response on subjective appetite and food intake in healthy elderly persons. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 53(4), pp. 305-16.
Kaplan RJ, Greenwood CE. Influence of Dietary Carbohydrates and Glycaemic Response On Subjective Appetite and Food Intake in Healthy Elderly Persons. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2002;53(4):305-16. PubMed PMID: 12090026.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of dietary carbohydrates and glycaemic response on subjective appetite and food intake in healthy elderly persons. AU - Kaplan,Randall J, AU - Greenwood,Carol E, PY - 2002/7/2/pubmed PY - 2002/8/29/medline PY - 2002/7/2/entrez SP - 305 EP - 16 JF - International journal of food sciences and nutrition JO - Int J Food Sci Nutr VL - 53 IS - 4 N2 - Increased satiety and decreased food intake are reported following the consumption of low glycaemic index (GI) foods, which gradually increase blood glucose. This observation, however, is not uniformly supported and few studies have examined the impact of different GI foods on satiety and intake in the elderly. After an overnight fast, 10 men and 10 women (aged 60-82 years) consumed similar amounts of available carbohydrate as high (glucose drink or potatoes) or low (barley) GI foods or a non-energy placebo drink on four mornings. Blood glucose and subjective appetite were measured throughout a 120 min post-ingestion period, followed by consumption of an ad libitum lunch. Differences in plasma glucose after test food ingestion (glucose > potatoes > barley > placebo; P < 0.03) did not predict subjective appetite or lunch intake. Potatoes increased subjective satiety the most, followed by barley, then glucose, which trended towards greater satiety than placebo. Potatoes led to less hunger than placebo (P = 0.0023) and less prospective consumption than the other three foods (P < 0.0083), and potatoes and barley led to greater fullness than glucose and placebo (P < 0.0001). Lunch intake was decreased, compared with placebo (502 +/- 47 kcal, P < 0.031), by potatoes (405 +/- 40 kcal) and barley (441 +/- 41 kcal); however, only potatoes (41.9 +/- 12.3%) led to greater compensation at lunch for test food ingestion compared with glucose (11.9 +/- 9.5%, P = 0.016). These results suggest that elderly subjects are sensitive to the effects of different foods on subjective appetite and food intake, and that the GI of the foods tested did not predict their effects on satiety and food intake. SN - 0963-7486 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12090026/Influence_of_dietary_carbohydrates_and_glycaemic_response_on_subjective_appetite_and_food_intake_in_healthy_elderly_persons_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09637480220138160 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -